What is Medical Gaslighting?

“Maybe it’s just all in my head?”

That was the question Isabella Rosario asked herself after unsuccessfully trying to get a diagnosis for her numerous debilitating symptoms for over a year-long period. These concerning symptoms included migraines, joint dislocations, chest pain, lightheadedness, pneumonia and more. When she first saw a doctor at her university clinic, and later, her GP, she was told what she was experiencing was due to stress related to her studies, and completely psychological in nature. Eventually, after seeing numerous specialists, she was diagnosed with two chronic health conditions – hypermobility spectrum disorder (HPD) and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). 

Isabella was fortunate to eventually get a diagnosis, but other chronic illness sufferers are not so lucky. Many medical professionals routinely dismiss their patients’ ailments and concerns – a phenomenon known as medical gaslighting. Eventually, patients who have been gaslit will begin to question their own sanity and wonder if their health problems are actually ‘real’ or just a figment of their own imagination.

According to the blog A Journey Through the Fog, medical gaslighting can take many forms, including:

  • Minimizing debilitating or dangerous symptoms. – “Your pain can’t be that bad
  • Blaming symptoms on mental illness. – “It’s all in your head” 
  • Assuming a diagnosis based on sex, race, identity, age, gender, ethnicity or weight. – “If you lost weight, your symptoms would disappear
  • Refusing to order important tests or imaging work. – “I know you don’t have [condition], I do not need an MRI to tell me this. I know how to do my job
  • Refusing to discuss the health issues with the patient. Berating patients for trying to self-diagnose. – “Who’s the doctor here, me or Google?” 

Throughout the course of my journey to being diagnosed with various autoimmune diseases and chronic illnesses, including Sjogren’s Syndrome, Hidradenitis Suppurativa and Benign Fasciculation Syndrome, my symptoms were either minimized or completely discounted by medical professionals. As I detail in the blog post, When Your Doctor Doesn’t Believe You, when I first brought up joint pain in my hands to my GP at age 19, he accused me of ‘texting too much’ when in reality, I had undiagnosed Sjogren’s Syndrome that was quickly developing into Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA).

In another instance, I needed a referral to see a Rheumatologist. When the nurse checked me in and asked about the reason for the visit, she said, ‘How does someone your age need to see a Rheumatologist? Did you wear high heels too much in high school?’ This kind of comment is not only rude and uncalled for, but patronizing and dismissive as well. People of all ages can experience a myriad of health issues, and should be taken seriously.

Last year, a video posted by a nurse on the popular social media platform TikTok drew outrage among the chronic illness community. The video featured a nurse imitating a patient struggling to breathe, while the nurse refused to help. She then captioned the video with the words: “We know when y’all are faking’. The video prompted many chronic illness patients to respond recounting their own stories of medical gaslighting, using the hashtag #PatientsAreNotFaking.

According to healthline.com, women are more likely to have their pain described as ’emotional’ or psychological in nature. Meanwhile, patients of color are less likely to be thoroughly examined as compared to their white counterparts. This systemic sexism and racism in the healthcare industry was also pointed out by many using the same hashtag:

In order for patients to get the healthcare they need (and deserve), medical professionals need to take their patients seriously; and that includes listening to their experiences, being compassionate, and issuing the necessary examinations and other tests needed to get an accurate diagnosis. My hope is that if you’ve ever experienced medical gaslighting, that you remain assertive and find a healthcare team that will take the necessary action to diagnose and treat your illness.

Have you experienced medical gaslighting before? If so, comment below to share your experience.

8-Year-Old Who Died from Autoimmune Diseases Leaves Legacy List of Rules

Ellie Pruitt was an 8-year-old girl who left a legacy of wisdom after passing from autoimmune diseases

Ellie Pruitt was an 8-year-old girl from Canton, Georgia, who passed away from various autoimmune diseases.

When Ellie was just three years old, she began to complain of pains in her legs and fatigue. Ellie’s parents took her to a Pediatric Rheumatologist who confirmed that she had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune condition causing painful inflammation in the joints. She took steroids and received injections of methotrexate, a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug designed to reduce the inflammation.

During Ellie’s short lifetime, she participated in medical studies to determine what causes autoimmune disease. Both of her parents, Heather and Chuck Pruitt, have autoimmune conditions themselves; Heather was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was a college senior, and Chuck was diagnosed with lupus at age 15.

In addition to the medical studies, Ellie and her family participated in the Walk to Cure Arthritis. They formed a team of families representing four children with the condition, called the Woodstock Warriors Against Juvenile Arthritis. Their team raised more than $5,000 for the cause.

Ellie participated in the Walk to Cure Arthritis with her family

After Ellie passed away on February 6th, her parents found a list of ‘rules to live by‘ that she had written. The rules were: 1) Have fun 2) No fighting 3) No pushing, shoving or hitting, and 4) Always love. After her parents found the list of rules, they decided to share it with her classmates to help comfort them after her passing.

Ellie Pruitt’s list of rules to live by

“It’s amazing that an 8-year-old little girl knew what we should focus on,” her mother Heather Pruitt said. “She started [rule] number 5, but erased it, because she knew that’s the greatest…If you can do all those things, you’re going to be in good shape.”

As a tribute to young Ellie’s wisdom, her hometown decided to display her list of rules in various places around their community. Local businesses like Bruster’s and Chick-fil-A displayed rules 1 and 4 on signage outside their stores.

Chick-fil-A displays a sign with two of Ellie’s rules on it

According to Ellie’s obituary, she was very artistic and loved to do crafts, draw, and paint. She was also a dancer and a musician (she played the piano). Her favorite places were school, church and the beach.

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Mattel Releases Diverse Barbie Collection, Featuring Dolls with Autoimmune Diseases and Disabilities

The New Line Features Dolls with Vitiligo, No Hair and Prosthetic Limb

Toymaker Mattel is drawing headlines with its latest Barbie collection, featuring a new line up of dolls with autoimmune diseases and disabilities, as well as a more diverse depiction of beauty.

The lineup includes a doll with vitiligo, an autoimmune condition in which the body attacks and destroys the cells that produce melanin, a pigment that give the skin color. This results in white patches or irregular shapes on the skin that can grow and spread.

Stella Pavlides, President and Chief Executive of the American Vitiligo Research Foundation in Clearwater, Florida, applauds the move by Mattel to showcase dolls with the condition. She says that children living with vitiligo could benefit from a doll that looks like them, especially when it comes to dealing with the social stigma of the disease. Pavlides, who has vitiligo herself, recalls that the social stigma of growing up with the condition was so severe, that store clerks would refuse to take money from her hand.

The lineup of Barbie dolls also features another model with no hair, which could be appealing to young girls who suffer from alopecia, an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks and destroys hair follicles. Conversely, the line also includes a male Ken doll with long, luscious locks, rather than the traditional preppy crew cut.

The South China Morning Post reports that the move by Mattel represents a broader move by society to be more accepting of diverse representations of beauty. For example, Canadian model Winnie Harlow is famous for becoming the first supermodel with vitiligo, and Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley recently revealed her battle with alopecia.

Mattel’s new collection of barbies also includes a doll with a golden prosthetic limb, demonstrating that beauty comes in all forms, and includes those with disabilities, too. In 2019, the company had released a doll in a wheelchair as well.

Mattel reports that over half of their dolls sold by the company came from a diverse set of backgrounds. In fact, a spokesperson for the company stated that their top selling doll was an African-American Barbie with an Afro.

What do you think of Mattel’s move to showcase more diversity in their dolls, particularly those showing chronic illnesses and disabilities? Leave your thoughts in the comments below!