Top Autoimmune Disease Books to Read in 2020

Have you read any good books lately about autoimmune disease? I am continuously consuming autoimmune-related content, whether it’s blogs, YouTube videos or full-fledged novels. Read on to learn about my favorite autoimmune disease books that you should poke your nose into in 2020!

1. The Autoimmune Epidemic

The Autoimmune Epidemic by journalist Donna Jackson Nakazawa is a thought-provoking read about the potential causes behind many autoimmune conditions. In her book, Jackson Nakazawa theorizes that environmental factors such as pollution, pesticides and other toxins are responsible for the alarming rise in autoimmune diseases over the course of the last few decades. Although not a medical professional or scientist herself, Jackson Nakazawa provides compelling evidence that had me wondering what really triggered my own autoimmune conditions. The author herself has an autoimmune disease called myasthenia gravis that severely affected her mobility. Her book has received praise from numerous acclaimed individuals, including U.S. Senator and Secretary of State John Kerry.

2. An Epidemic of Absence

An Epidemic of Absence by Moises Velasquez-Manoff is another exploratory book about the causes behind autoimmune disease. His main theory is that autoimmune conditions, as well as allergies, are caused by a lack of actual communicable diseases in modern society. In ancient times, our ancestors had to contend with parasites and infectious diseases, like hepatitis A, measles, mumps and tuberculosis, from which they could easily die. However, our modern ‘too-clean’ environment has lead to our immune system attacking a new target – our own bodies – instead. I found that Velasquez-Manoff’s book was a direct contrast to The Autoimmune Epidemic (referenced above), since it posits that autoimmune diseases are caused by an absence of environmental triggers, rather than their presence. The author himself has alopecia universalis, an autoimmune disease that results in total body hair loss.

3. The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principals

The Wahls Protocol by Dr. Terry Wahls is an excellent read. I first heard about Dr. Wahls when I watched her viral TedTalk video, Minding Your Mitochondria, in which she describes the relationship between the body’s gut microbiome and the development of autoimmune disease. In her book, Dr. Wahls, who has multiple sclerosis (MS), details how she went from being wheelchair-bound to competing in a marathon after adopting the principals of her dietary protocol. Before implementing the protocol, her MS continued to worsen, despite receiving excellent treatment from some of the top neurologists in the country. Dr. Wahls also stresses the importance of vitamin D naturally derived from the sun in order to maintain a healthy immune system. Although Dr. Wahls’ advice isn’t 100% proven, her medical background and own track record of success healing herself and others is certainly persuasive.

4. The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook

The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook is the first of several novels penned by Mickey Trescott and co-author Angie Alt. The focus of the book is about the Autoimmune Protocol (AIP), a dietary regimen that involves eating paleo, avoiding gluten and dairy, as well as numerous other foods that could ‘trigger’ an autoimmune reaction. I first read the book when I borrowed it from my local library; I had to wait to read the book though, since it was immensely popular, and I was number 25 on the waiting list! Since then, a family member gifted me with a follow-up book by Trescott, called The Nutrient-Dense Kitchen. The book is chock-full of great recipes that are AIP-friendly. Something I like about Trescott’s books is that they not only provide easy to follow recipes, but actually explain why it is that eating this way can help alleviate autoimmune symptoms for some people, including a deep dive into the science behind leaky gut. Trescott herself has both Celiac disease and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis.

5. The New Sjogren’s Syndrome Handbook

The New Sjogren’s Syndrome Handbook was written by the Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) and edited by a physician familiar with the disease. What I like about this book is that it’s specific to Sjogren’s Syndrome (SJS), which is an autoimmune condition that I have. The book goes into the fundamentals about SJS, including what the disease is, how it is diagnosed, the main symptoms, complications, and treatment options. The one critique I would have for the book is that although it’s called the ‘New’ Sjogren’s Syndrome Handbook, the book was originally written in the 1990’s, so it’s not really new (though the foundation has come out with revised editions since). Overall, I think it’s a great read for a newly-diagnosed patient with Sjogren’s, or a family member/friend of someone with Sjogren’s, so that they can understand more about the disease.

Those are my top 5 autoimmune disease related books! Do you have any favorite novels related to chronic illness, autoimmune disease, or other health-related topics? If so, please share in the comments below!

10 Facts about Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA)

According to the Mayo Clinic, Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that occurs when one’s body attacks the synovium (the lining of the membranes surrounding one’s joints). Read on to learn 10 interesting facts about this chronic autoimmune condition.

1. Joint pain is a hallmark of the disease

The John Hopkins Arthritis Center states that pain and swelling of the small joints—such as those in the hands and feet—is a hallmark symptom of the disease. However, any joint in the body can be affected by RA. Other than pain and swelling, the inflammation caused by RA can lead to stiffness, deformity, and even loss of function. Joint damage occurs in 80% to 85% of affected patients, with the majority of the damage occurring in the first two years of developing the disease.

2. RA doesn’t just affect the joints

Although joint pain is the most common symptom, RA affects more that just one’s joints. Other manifestations of the disease include eye inflammation, a low white blood cell count, subcutaneous nodules (skin lesions), fatigue and lung disease. What’s more, RA is known to be associated with a higher risk of lymphoma (a type of cancer), anemia (low iron levels), osteoporosis, and depression.

3. It puts patients at risk for death

Left untreated, RA increases one’s risk of mortality. The John Hopkins Arthritis Center states that untreated individuals with RA are twice as likely to die compared to unaffected individuals of the same age. Furthermore, RA can reduce life expectancy by 10 to 15 years.

4. It’s more common than you think

RA is in fact the most common type of autoimmune arthritis, affecting more than 1.3 million Americans. Approximately 75% of all RA patients are women, and 1-3% of the American female population is predicted to develop the disease over the course of their lifetime.

5. People of all ages can be affected

A common misconception of RA is that it’s an ‘old person disease’. Not true. The onset of the disease most commonly occurs in those ages 30 to 50; however, anyone of any age can develop the condition. Furthermore, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, which occurs in those ages 16 and under, currently affects 50,000 children and youth in the U.S. alone.

6. There are other types of arthritis too

RA is mistakenly believed to only affect senior citizens, since it is often confused with osteoarthritis, which occurs when the protective cartilage that cushions the ends of your bones wears down over time. Other types of arthritis include psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and gout. To learn more about each of these different types of arthritis, visit the John Hopkins Arthritis Center’s website.

7. There are multiple risk factors

Although the exact cause of RA is unknown, scientists believe that a combination of genetic and environmental factors may put individuals at a greater risk of developing the disease. Beyond being female and middle-aged, other risk factors include: having a family history of the disease, smoking, exposure to substances like asbestos or silica, and obesity.

8. There are a variety of treatment options

Rheumatologists often prescribe non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to reduce the inflammation and pain associated with RA. Other prescription medications that treat RA include corticosteroids, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and biologic response modifiers. Non-pharmaceutical treatment options include physical therapy, chiropractor treatment, and in some cases, surgery. To read more about these treatment options, visit the RA Support Network website.

9. The prognosis of the disease varies

Some patients with RA report only mild symptoms that place few limitations on their everyday lives. However, other patients experience significant pain and impact on their lives, including their ability to work. One of the main factors that predicts the disease prognosis is early detection. The earlier RA is identified, the sooner it can be effectively treated and joint inflammation and damage can be reduced.

10. There is hope

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis, check out the American College of Rheumatology’s patient education videos to learn more about the condition. Additional patient and caregiver resources can be found on their website, including fact sheets, case studies and current news.

Thank you for stopping by Autoimmune Warrior. If this article was informative to you, please like, share, and comment below!

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Practicing Gratitude When You Have a Chronic Illness

Gratitude doesn’t change what we have in front of us; it changes the way we see what we have

Anonymous

This past Thursday was Thanksgiving here in the United States. I spent the day with my husband’s family and I couldn’t be more grateful to have them close by when I’m far away from my own family.

This got me thinking about practicing gratitude in general. How often do we really give thanks for what we have? Only once a year, when Thanksgiving rolls around? Or are we only thankful for what we have when we’ve lost it (in other words, when it’s too late)?

When you have an autoimmune disease or any other type of chronic illness, it can be challenging to feel grateful for what you have. I mean, how could I feel thankful for having near-constant joint pain, fatigue, widespread dryness, skin issues and brain fog, among other symptoms of Sjogren’s Syndrome and Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS)?

But, if I challenge myself to think harder, I can actually think of many ways in which I should be grateful for what I have. Many people, especially those who are less fortunate or who live in developing countries, don’t have access to a reliable healthcare system, including adequate treatment options, necessary medications, and educated health care professionals. Even here in the United States, many people with chronic illness struggle to afford their medications, health insurance or co-pays for doctor’s visits. While I am by no means rich, I’m thankful that I have the ability to take care of my healthcare needs when many people cannot.

Another thing that I’m grateful for is the amazing chronic illness community that I’ve connected with in the past two years of blogging on this site. Having a chronic illness can sometimes be lonely, and you may feel like no one understands what you’re going through (especially if none of your family or friends have a disease themselves, or if you don’t have a satisfactory support system). However, by connecting with others on WordPress, Instagram and Reddit who are in a similar situation, I’ve quickly realized that I’m far from being alone, and I’ve learned new methods of self-care that have helped me manage my illness.

Thanks for reading this blog post! If you’re an Autoimmune Warrior, what are you thankful for (that you may have forgotten to be grateful about)? Comment below and let me know!

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