April is Sjögren’s Awareness Month

Raise Awareness About Sjögren’s Syndrome by Sharing Your Story

April is Sjögren’s Syndrome awareness month! To raise awareness about this autoimmune disease, the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) will be posting a daily story about someone affected by the disease on their social media platforms with the hashtag #ThisisSjogren’s. To participate in the campaign, fill out and submit the questionnaire at the following link along with a photo: https://info.sjogrens.org/conquering-sjogrens.

Here’s my questionnaire:

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Name: Isabel

Current age: 26

Age when diagnosed: 20

City/State: San Diego, California

How would you describe yourself in one word (teacher, graphic designer, stay at home parent): Marketing Coordinator

What are your top three most difficult symptoms to live with: Eye/mouth dryness, joint pain, fatigue

What is your most difficult symptom that people don’t understand: Brain fog – it’s an invisible symptom, and it’s hard to explain

What do you wish people knew about your Sjögren’s: 

That the condition involves the whole body, and it’s more than just eye and mouth dryness (and even those can be destructive symptoms).

What’s your best Sjögren’s tip:
Find a positive outlet in which you can discuss your disease – whether that’s a support group, talking with a loved one or keeping a journal. I write about Sjögren’s on my blog, autoimmunewarrior.org, and use it to connect with others who have the disease.

10 Facts About Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

According to the Lupus Foundation of America, lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that can damage the body’s vital organs, skin and joints. Read on to find out 10 facts about this chronic autoimmune condition.

1. It is more common than you think

Lupus affects 5 million people worldwide, and 16,000 new cases are reported every year, reports the Lupus Foundation of America. In the United States alone, lupus is estimated to affect up to 1.5 million people. The exact prevalence of lupus among the general population is hard to determine, however, since the symptoms often mimic those of other disorders. For reasons unknown, lupus has become 10 times more common in industrialized Western countries over the last 50 years.

2. It mostly affects women

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, Females develop lupus nine times more often than their male counterparts. It is more common in younger women, peaking during the childbearing years; however, 20 percent of lupus cases occur in people over age 50. Because lupus largely impacts women, sex hormones are thought to play a role in the onset of this complex disease.

3. Your ethnicity may play a role

In the United States, lupus is more common in people of color, including those of African, Asian, Hispanic/Latino, Native American or Pacific Islander decent. In these populations, lupus is known to develop at a younger age and tends to be more severe as well.

4. Skin problems are a telltale sign

One of the characteristic signs of lupus is a red rash across the cheeks and nose bridge, which worsens when exposed to sunlight, called a ‘butterfly rash’ due to its shape. Other skin problems include calcium deposits under the skin, damaged blood vessels in the skin, and tiny red spots called petechiae, which occurs as a result of bleeding under the skin. Ulcers may also occur in the mucosal lining of the skin. To read more about how lupus affects the skin, click here.

5. Heart problems are also common

Pericarditis, an inflammation of the sac-like membrane around the heart, and abnormalities of the heart valves, which control blood flow, can occur in patients with lupus. Heart disease caused by fatty buildup in the blood vessels, called atherosclerosis, is more prevalent in those with lupus than the general population. To read more about how lupus affects the heart, click here.

6. Lupus affects the nervous system too

A lesser known fact about lupus is its impact on the body’s central nervous system. For example, lupus causes damaging inflammation, which may result in peripheral neuropathy, which involves abnormal sensations and weakness in the limbs. Lupus can also cause cognitive impairment, also called ‘brain fog’, which makes it difficult to process, learn and remember information. Seizures and stroke may also occur.

7. It may be genetic

Lupus tends to run in families. However, the exact inheritance pattern is unknown. Certain gene variations can increase or decrease the risk of developing the disease; however, not everyone with the disease will get lupus. Relatives of those with lupus have a 5-13% chance of developing the disease. Sometimes, someone with a family member with lupus may inherit a different, but related, autoimmune disease, such as Sjögren’s Syndrome or Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA).

8. Lupus can impact one’s quality of life

According to research conducted by the Lupus Foundation of America, 65% of lupus patients state that chronic pain is the most difficult part of having the disease. Furthermore, 76% of patients say that the disease has caused them to develop fatigue so severe that they have had to cut back on social activities. A further 89% of patients report that they can no longer work full-time as a result of their disease. Lupus can also cause mental health problems such as anxiety and depression.

9. The prognosis of the disease varies

Patients with lupus often have episodes during which the condition worsens (called ‘exacerbations’ or ‘flares’), followed by periods of remission. However, since lupus does not currently have a cure, it is a life-long condition. Lupus is known to get worse over time, and damage to the body’s vital organs can be life-threatening. This is why it is important to work with a team of medical professionals that understand the disease.

10. There is hope

If you or a loved one has been newly diagnosed with lupus, check out the Lupus Foundation of America’s newly diagnosed webpage. It is full of resources about the disease, including treatment options, financing your care, and tips on how to live a healthy lifestyle with the disease. You can also sign up for their 8-week email series with tips and resources to empower you to learn more about your condition. The foundation also recently released a new research center on their website, Inside Lupus Research, so that you can keep up-to-date on all of the latest scientific reports, disease management and treatment news.

Thank you for stopping by Autoimmune Warrior. If this article was helpful for you, please like, share, and comment below!

 

When your doctor doesn’t believe you

Have you ever complained to your family physician about your symptoms, only to be totally dismissed?

Whether you’ve been diagnosed with an autoimmune disease or not, your ailments may be ignored or written off as ‘not a big deal’ by a health care professional.

This has often happened to me over the course of the last 7+ years of having an autoimmune condition. For example, before I was even diagnosed with Sjögren’s Syndrome, I was told that my symptoms, including joint pain, eye and mouth dryness, recurrent ulcers, yeast infections, and fatigue had a plausible, non-disease related cause, and weren’t really a ‘big deal’ anyway.

Even worse, other health care professionals told me my symptoms were nothing more than a figment of my imagination.

Worse yet, after many unproductive visits to doctors’ offices and labs, with little to no explanation for what could be wrong, I actually started to believe…could I be imagining this?

One family MD, for example, told me my joint pain was probably a result of ‘texting too much’. As a fresh-faced teenager, I probably didn’t look like someone who could be experiencing debilitating joint pain. But that shouldn’t matter. In fact, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, affecting those 16 years and younger, affects over 50,000 people in the United States alone.

Another time, I needed a referral to see a rheumatologist. The nurse who checked me in asked, “How does someone your age need a rheumatologist? Did you wear high heels too much in high school?” Not only was her questioning intrusive, rude, and uncalled for, it invalidated my experience as a patient with a chronic health condition.

As a result, I became even more reticent to explain my health issues with the people who I should be speaking with the most…health care professionals! And sadly, this is too often the experience for others living with autoimmune or other chronic health conditions.

The Sjgoren’s Syndrome Foundation recently shared a tip on social media, stating, “Remember that just because a symptom can’t be seen easily, it is still important. If you feel that a physician dismisses your Sjögren’s symptoms, help educate them and/or find another physician”. Many commenters responded by lamenting their own experiences with not being taken seriously by their healthcare providers. One woman commented, “My dentist keeps telling me to stop making excuses for my bad teeth”, referring to the fact that Sjögren’s often has a devastating impact on patients’ teeth, despite maintaining a solid oral hygiene routine.

If I had to give one piece of advice for anyone with chronic health problems, diagnosed or not, I would say to never give up. If your physician doesn’t take you seriously, move on. This doesn’t mean that you don’t listen to your doctor’s medical advice; this means that if they tell you it’s ‘all in your head’, or ‘it can’t be that bad, can it?’, and you know they are wrong, then you stand your ground.

Remember, you are the best advocate for your own health! Check out these helpful tips published by WebMD about talking to your doctor.

Top News in Autoimmunity – Week of Feb. 6, 2019

Early Onset Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome May Carry a Worse Prognosis

French researchers have discovered that patients diagnosed with early onset Primary Sjögren’s Syndrome may carry a worse prognosis over the course of the disease. Early onset is defined as a diagnosis before age 35.

The study, reported in Rheumatology, states that early onset of this autoimmune disease was found to be associated with a higher frequency of:

  • Salivary gland enlargement
  • Lymph node enlargement
  • Bleeding underneath the skin
  • Liver involvement
  • ANA (antinuclear antibodies, especially anti-SSA and anti-SSB antibodies)
  • Positive Rheumatoid Factor levels
  • Low C3 and C4 complement protein levels
  • Increased levels of immunoglobulin antibodies in the bloodstream

Furthermore, researchers also acknowledged that those with an early onset of the disease showed a worsening progression in their symptoms, whereas those with a later onset showed significant improvement.

Read more about this ground-breaking study here.

’90 Day Fiancé’ Star Ashley Marston to Undergo Additional Surgery Following Kidney Failure

Ashley Marston, star on TLC’s hit reality TV series ’90 Day Fiancé’, recently revealed that she is undergoing additional surgery following a health scare.

Although she did not reveal the nature of her impending surgical procedure, Marston did reveal that she has an autoimmune condition called lupus. Lupus is a disease in which the body’s own immune system attacks its vital organs. In Marston’s case, she suffers from lupus nephritis, which causes inflammation in the kidneys.

After being found unresponsive in her home last month, she was rushed to the hospital and treated for kidney failure. Her upcoming surgery is speculated to be related to this recent hospitalization.

Fans are wishing Marston the best with her surgery and recovery. Read more about her shocking story here.

Interested in more #autoimmunewarrior news? Visit my last news post, here!

Working with a chronic illness

Working with a chronic health condition can be a challenge. Sometimes, you may not feel ‘up to’ working, but you still have to put in a full day on the job. There are times when you feel sick— but perhaps not sick enough to warrant taking a sick day. Even if you do take time off, there may be judgments from co-workers that don’t believe that what you’re going through is real, especially invisible illness symptoms, such as pain.

When looking back through my life, I can see various ways in which my chronic illness, Sjögren’s Syndrome, has impacted my work. For example, I experience significant joint pain after doing hours’ worth of typing. Also, the stale office air worsens my dry eye and mouth symptoms, causing me to use copious amounts of eye drops and saliva-stimulating medications. Also, debilitating fatigue affects my energy levels and impacts my ability to produce as much as I want to.

As a result, I have had to adjust my lifestyle in order to stay healthy and maintain my productivity while on the job. Here are a few tips that have helped me:

  • Getting a good night’s rest – Before being diagnosed with Sjögren’s, I could get 4-5 hours of sleep per night, and still be productive and alert throughout the day. But no more. I must get at least 7-8 hours’ worth of solid rest to help combat against disease-related fatigue.
  • Being mindful of my eating habits – With a chronic health condition, I need to be extra mindful of what I’m putting into my body. While others may be able to sustain themselves on caffeine and sweets- I know that doing likewise isn’t going to make my body feel any better; so I pack a healthy lunch, and choose the healthy option when I eat out.
  • Organizing my treatment plan – I think it’s extremely important to be organized when you have a chronic illness. For example, I record my doctor’s appointments on my calendar and stay on top of taking my medications and supplements, which it vital to treating my symptoms.
  • Staying active – Exercising, while also holding down a job and managing my chronic illness, can be a challenge. However, I know it’s important to stay active, because it makes my body stronger and more resilient, and I’m able to complete tasks using less energy as a result. So, I go to the gym and take walks around my neighborhood and in the business park on my lunch break at least a few times a week.

When you have to leave your job

I recently started following a YouTuber by the name of Samantha Wayne. In her YouTube channel, called Live, Hope, Lupus, she discusses having to leave her full-time job as a result of her autoimmune condition. You can check out the video here.

Having to leave a job due to health reasons can be devastating. In addition to the financial benefit of having a job, many individuals (especially Americans) rely on their job to pay at least partially for their costly health insurance premiums. I have found that there is also a psychological benefit to having a job; it gives me confidence, makes me feel like I am ‘valuable’ and helping others, and feel like I am a productive member of society. Although one shouldn’t rely solely on a job for their self-esteem, I do believe that it’s a contributing factor.

In Samantha’s case, she transitioned to several part-time business and work opportunities in order to earn a living, and have more time and flexibility to manage her lupus and Sjögren’s symptoms. Exploring other work alternatives, such as freelancing, part-time and contract work, or starting your own business, might be an ideal way to balance both your health and financial commitments.

Final Thoughts

If you are finding it challenging to keep up with managing both your chronic health condition, work and other life demands, I would encourage you to implement the tips above to see if it makes a positive difference. Don’t let your disease get in the way of accomplishing your dreams and goals!

How do you manage your chronic illness while working? Has your health impacted your ability to do your job? Do you have any additional health management tips? Comment below!

 

Happy New Year’s! What are your 2019 Resolutions?

Happy New Year’s Day!

Firstly, happy New Year’s Day and thank you to those of you who already follow the Autoimmune Warrior blog! I am so looking forward to 2019 and all of the adventures and experiences that are to come.

New Year’s Resolutions

What are your resolutions for 2019? One of my main resolutions is to focus more on my health and well being. For example, I’d like to go to the gym more, work out with my husband, and attend more fitness classes. I also want to cook more meals at home, and learn new healthy recipes.

Finally, I want to spend more time taking care of my autoimmune conditions- especially Sjögren’s Syndrome, which is the main condition that affects me. This involves attending doctor’s appointments, taking all of my required medications, and listening more to my body- even if it sometimes means saying ‘no’ to things that I want to do, but would over-exert myself.

Here’s to 2019!

So here’s to the year ahead – wishing all of you readers success in your endeavors this year.

What are your goals and aspirations for 2019? I would love to hear them. Comment below!

 

 

Top News in Autoimmunity – Week of Dec. 5, 2018

Sjogren’s non-profit seeks applicants for research grants

The Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) is now accepting applications for research grants. Two distinct awards are being offered: the SSF Pilot Research Award for $25,000 and the SSF High Impact Research Award for $75,000. To view more details and apply, see the SSF website.

Trump administration proposes access barriers to drugs critical to autoimmune patients health

The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) reports that the Trump administration has proposed a Medicare rule that allows for step therapy and prior authorization restrictions. The AARDA states that such a rule would interfere with the patient-physician relationship, and can result in delayed treatment, increased disease activity, loss of function, and potentially irreversible disease progression for Medicare beneficiaries. Read more here.

Sharing the Journey series provides tips on explaining lupus

The Lupus Foundation of America has published a blog series Sharing the Journey to highlight the perspectives and personal experiences of those who struggle with lupus each day. In the series’ latest installment, contributors describe how they explain lupus to family, friends, co-workers, and others. Read their compelling stories here.

MS Society of Canada launches Vitamin D recommendations for MS

The Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society of Canada has released a report detailing Vitamin D recommendations for those living with MS for at-risk populations.

Vitamin D, dubbed the ‘sunshine vitamin’, is produced by our skin through sun exposure, but can also come from other sources such as food (eggs, fortified dairy products, and fish) and supplements. The Society has long funded research on the relationship between Vitamin D levels and MS. The recommendations have been summarized into two reports; one for researchers and healthcare professionals, and another for laypersons. Read more under the Society’s research news.