Practicing Gratitude When You Have a Chronic Illness

Gratitude doesn’t change what we have in front of us; it changes the way we see what we have

Anonymous

This past Thursday was Thanksgiving here in the United States. I spent the day with my husband’s family and I couldn’t be more grateful to have them close by when I’m far away from my own family.

This got me thinking about practicing gratitude in general. How often do we really give thanks for what we have? Only once a year, when Thanksgiving rolls around? Or are we only thankful for what we have when we’ve lost it (in other words, when it’s too late)?

When you have an autoimmune disease or any other type of chronic illness, it can be challenging to feel grateful for what you have. I mean, how could I feel thankful for having near-constant joint pain, fatigue, widespread dryness, skin issues and brain fog, among other symptoms of Sjogren’s Syndrome and Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS)?

But, if I challenge myself to think harder, I can actually think of many ways in which I should be grateful for what I have. Many people, especially those who are less fortunate or who live in developing countries, don’t have access to a reliable healthcare system, including adequate treatment options, necessary medications, and educated health care professionals. Even here in the United States, many people with chronic illness struggle to afford their medications, health insurance or co-pays for doctor’s visits. While I am by no means rich, I’m thankful that I have the ability to take care of my healthcare needs when many people cannot.

Another thing that I’m grateful for is the amazing chronic illness community that I’ve connected with in the past two years of blogging on this site. Having a chronic illness can sometimes be lonely, and you may feel like no one understands what you’re going through (especially if none of your family or friends have a disease themselves, or if you don’t have a satisfactory support system). However, by connecting with others on WordPress, Instagram and Reddit who are in a similar situation, I’ve quickly realized that I’m far from being alone, and I’ve learned new methods of self-care that have helped me manage my illness.

Thanks for reading this blog post! If you’re an Autoimmune Warrior, what are you thankful for (that you may have forgotten to be grateful about)? Comment below and let me know!

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Top News in Autoimmune Disease – Sept. 22, 2019

Kim Kardashian West gets an ultrasound of her hand, leading to a ‘painful and scary’ diagnosis.

Kim Kardashian West Discusses ‘Painful and Scary’ Autoimmune Diagnosis

Celebrity and business mogul Kim Kardashian West discussed her recent autoimmune diagnosis on an episode of Keeping Up with the Kardashians. During the episode, Kardashian West visits a doctor with symptoms including pain, swelling and stiffness in her joints. She already has an autoimmune condition called psoriasis that causes red, flaky and scaly patches to appear on her skin, which she had developed at age 25 after catching a cold. Now, at age 38, she was informed that her psoriasis has morphed into psoriatic arthritis.

According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, 125 million people worldwide suffer from psoriasis. Furthermore, it’s estimated that 1 in 5 individuals with psoriasis will develop psoriatic arthritis in their lifetime.

Kardashian West said that her symptoms, including joint pain in her hands, got so bad that she was unable to even pick up a toothbrush. An initial blood test she took came back as positive for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, but it was later shown to be a false positive after a review of her symptoms and getting an ultrasound of her hands.

Despite the harrowing diagnosis, Kardashian West is maintaining a positive attitude, saying “It’s still painful and scary, but I was happy to have a diagnosis. No matter what autoimmune condition I had, I was going to get through it, and they are all manageable with proper care.”

The star also bonded with fellow beauty mogul and fashion model Winnie Harlow, who has an autoimmune condition called vitiligo. As she revealed during a recent interview with Jimmy Fallon, Kardashian West spoke to Harlow for over an hour to get her ‘opinion and advice’ on her autoimmune diagnosis.

To learn more about psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, visit the National Psoriasis Foundation website.

J.K. Rowling has made a multi-million dollar donation to fund MS research, at a clinic named after her late mother

J.K. Rowling Donates Millions to Fund Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Research

J.K. Rowling, renowned author of the Harry Potter book series, has made a generous donation to fund Multiple Sclerosis (MS) research in the U.K.

Her donation, in the amount of 15.3 Million British Pounds (equivalent to $18.8 Million USD), will be used to construct a new facility for the Anne Rowling Clinic at the University of Edinburgh, which is dedicated to MS research.

The Anne Rowling Clinic was established at the Scotland-based university in 2010, when J.K. Rowling had made another generous donation to fund MS research. The clinic was named after her mother, who suffered from MS and passed away due to complications from the disease at the young age of 45.

Rowling has said that she is immensely proud of the work that the clinic has accomplished, and that they are providing “practical, on the ground support and care for people with MS.” The University’s Vice Chancellor, Professor Peter Mathieson, also commented, “We are immensely honored that J. K. Rowling has chosen to continue her support for the Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic. This inspiring donation will fund a whole new generation of researchers who are focused on discovering and delivering better treatments and therapies for patients.”

To learn more about the Anne Rowling Clinic and to view a video of their important work, click here.

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10 Facts About Sjögren’s Syndrome

According to the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF), Sjögren’s is a systemic autoimmune disease that impacts the entire body, including the eyes, mouth, joints, nerves and major organs. In honor of World Sjögren’s Day, read on to learn 10 facts about this chronic autoimmune condition.

1. It is more common than you think

The SSF estimates that there are as many as 4 million Americans living with the disease, and it’s the second most common autoimmune condition. The exact prevalence of the condition is difficult to determine, however, since the symptoms tend to mimic those of other conditions, such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. It can even be confused with menopause, allergies, and drug side effects.

2. It mostly affects women

The SSF states that nine out of 10 Sjögren’s patients are women, and the average age of diagnosis is the late 40s. However, the disease can impact anyone of any age, including men and children as well.

3. It causes extensive dryness

Sjögren’s Syndrome develops as a result of the body’s immune system attacking and destroying the body’s exocrine, or moisture-producing, glands. As a consequence, patients experience widespread dryness throughout their body, but especially impacting their eyes, nose, mouth, skin, vagina and joints.

4. It affects the eyes

The disease is often first detected as a result of eye-related symptoms. This includes dry, gritty eyes that feel like sandpaper when blinking and swollen tear glands. Dry eyes can in turn lead to blurred vision, infections, corneal ulcerations and blepharitis. Several of the eye tests that can be used to help diagnose the condition include a Schirmer test, to measure tear production, and a Rose Bengal and Lissamine Green test, to examine dry spots on the eye’s surface.

5. It affects the mouth, throat and nose

Sjögren’s also affects one’s mouth, throat and nasal cavity; the main symptom being dryness. This, in turn, leads to a whole host of other symptoms, such as mouth sores, dental decay, oral thrush (a yeast infection of the mouth), recurrent sinusitis, nose bleeds, heartburn, reflux esophagitis, and difficulty speaking and swallowing. Some physicians administer a lip gland biopsy as a part of the diagnosis process.

6. It impacts one’s joints too

As the immune system destroys the body’s moisture-producing glands, this results in a decrease in synovial fluid, which helps to keep the joints lubricated. This causes inflammatory joint pain and musculoskeletal pain, and can even lead to the development of rheumatoid arthritis, as shown through a positive Rheumatoid Factor (RF) reading in the blood. In fact, the main physicians who treat Sjögren’s are rheumatologists.

7. Neurological problems are also common

Sjögren’s causes a variety of nervous system symptoms, including nerve pain and peripheral neuropathy (a numbness and tingling in the extremities). Other neurological problems include difficulty concentrating and memory loss, often referred to as “brain fog”.

8. The prognosis of the disease varies

Patients may find that their symptoms plateau, worsen, or, uncommonly, go into remission. A French research study published in Rheumatology also found that early onset primary Sjögren’s Syndrome carried a worse prognosis over the course of the disease (‘early onset’ is defined as a diagnosis before age 35). While some Sjögren’s patients experience mild discomfort, others suffer debilitating symptoms that greatly impair their quality of life.

9. It can increase one’s risk of cancer

A German study found that Sjögren’s Syndrome moderately increases one’s risk of developing Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL). NHL is a cancer of the lymphatic system, which includes the lymph nodes, spleen, and other tissues. The lifetime risk of developing NHL by age 80 is 8% among men and 5.4% among women with Sjögren’s. This is compared to a risk of 1.6% of men and 1.1% of women in the general population.

10. There is hope

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with Sjögren’s, check out the SSF’s video series, Conquering Sjögren’s, and their patient-published Self-Help Booklet. The foundation’s website, www.sjogrens.org, also contains a wealth of resources on the disease, including information about treatment options, survival tips, fact sheets, and even template letters for your health insurance company. You can also check out their extensive network of support groups.

Thank you for stopping by Autoimmune Warrior. If this article was informative to you, please like, share, and comment below!

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