10 Facts About Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE)

According to the Lupus Foundation of America, lupus is a chronic autoimmune disease that can damage the body’s vital organs, skin and joints. Read on to find out 10 facts about this chronic autoimmune condition.

1. It is more common than you think

Lupus affects 5 million people worldwide, and 16,000 new cases are reported every year, reports the Lupus Foundation of America. In the United States alone, lupus is estimated to affect up to 1.5 million people. The exact prevalence of lupus among the general population is hard to determine, however, since the symptoms often mimic those of other disorders. For reasons unknown, lupus has become 10 times more common in industrialized Western countries over the last 50 years.

2. It mostly affects women

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, Females develop lupus nine times more often than their male counterparts. It is more common in younger women, peaking during the childbearing years; however, 20 percent of lupus cases occur in people over age 50. Because lupus largely impacts women, sex hormones are thought to play a role in the onset of this complex disease.

3. Your ethnicity may play a role

In the United States, lupus is more common in people of color, including those of African, Asian, Hispanic/Latino, Native American or Pacific Islander decent. In these populations, lupus is known to develop at a younger age and tends to be more severe as well.

4. Skin problems are a telltale sign

One of the characteristic signs of lupus is a red rash across the cheeks and nose bridge, which worsens when exposed to sunlight, called a ‘butterfly rash’ due to its shape. Other skin problems include calcium deposits under the skin, damaged blood vessels in the skin, and tiny red spots called petechiae, which occurs as a result of bleeding under the skin. Ulcers may also occur in the mucosal lining of the skin. To read more about how lupus affects the skin, click here.

5. Heart problems are also common

Pericarditis, an inflammation of the sac-like membrane around the heart, and abnormalities of the heart valves, which control blood flow, can occur in patients with lupus. Heart disease caused by fatty buildup in the blood vessels, called atherosclerosis, is more prevalent in those with lupus than the general population. To read more about how lupus affects the heart, click here.

6. Lupus affects the nervous system too

A lesser known fact about lupus is its impact on the body’s central nervous system. For example, lupus causes damaging inflammation, which may result in peripheral neuropathy, which involves abnormal sensations and weakness in the limbs. Lupus can also cause cognitive impairment, also called ‘brain fog’, which makes it difficult to process, learn and remember information. Seizures and stroke may also occur.

7. It may be genetic

Lupus tends to run in families. However, the exact inheritance pattern is unknown. Certain gene variations can increase or decrease the risk of developing the disease; however, not everyone with the disease will get lupus. Relatives of those with lupus have a 5-13% chance of developing the disease. Sometimes, someone with a family member with lupus may inherit a different, but related, autoimmune disease, such as Sjögren’s Syndrome or Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA).

8. Lupus can impact one’s quality of life

According to research conducted by the Lupus Foundation of America, 65% of lupus patients state that chronic pain is the most difficult part of having the disease. Furthermore, 76% of patients say that the disease has caused them to develop fatigue so severe that they have had to cut back on social activities. A further 89% of patients report that they can no longer work full-time as a result of their disease. Lupus can also cause mental health problems such as anxiety and depression.

9. The prognosis of the disease varies

Patients with lupus often have episodes during which the condition worsens (called ‘exacerbations’ or ‘flares’), followed by periods of remission. However, since lupus does not currently have a cure, it is a life-long condition. Lupus is known to get worse over time, and damage to the body’s vital organs can be life-threatening. This is why it is important to work with a team of medical professionals that understand the disease.

10. There is hope

If you or a loved one has been newly diagnosed with lupus, check out the Lupus Foundation of America’s newly diagnosed webpage. It is full of resources about the disease, including treatment options, financing your care, and tips on how to live a healthy lifestyle with the disease. You can also sign up for their 8-week email series with tips and resources to empower you to learn more about your condition. The foundation also recently released a new research center on their website, Inside Lupus Research, so that you can keep up-to-date on all of the latest scientific reports, disease management and treatment news.

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Top News in Autoimmunity – Week of Dec. 19, 2018

NMO

Edmonton fighter diagnosed with rare disease

Victor Valimaki, a 37-year old professional fighter from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, was left crippled by a rare autoimmune disorder.

Although Valimaki has fought in over two dozen professional fights, leading him to a successful career as an Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) mixed-martial arts fighter, he was recently diagnosed with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), otherwise known as Devic’s disease.

This autoimmune condition affects the body’s optic nerves, spinal cord and brain. For Valimaki, the disease caused him to lose his vision, speech, and ability to walk. Although he has since regained his sight, he is still struggling with the other consequences of the disorder.

Read his full story and watch the video on CTV News Edmonton.

Italian biotech company raises 17M€ to fund gene therapies for autoimmune diseases

An Italian biotechnology company named Altheia raised over 17 million euros this week to fund gene therapies that could potentially treat many incurable autoimmune diseases.

The company’s technology, which uses gene therapy to engineer bone marrow stem cells to express a molecule called PD-L1 that inactivates the immune system’s T cells. In other words, the molecule released will ‘hit the breaks’ on the body’s immune system, avoiding an immune system attack on healthy tissue.

Paolo Rizzardi, the company’s CEO, has stated that he expects clinical trials for autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes to begin in 2021.

Read more about this exciting new development on LABIOTECH.eu.

 

 

 

Top News in Autoimmunity – Week of Dec. 12, 2018

Man left paralyzed from the nose down by rare autoimmune disorder

David Braham, a 40-year old man from the United Kingdom, came down with a bad case of food poisoning, which he believes was triggered by eating chicken curry. A few days later, he was in the hospital being put into an induced coma.

It turns out, the food poisoning had caused him to develop a rare autoimmune condition called Guillain-Barre Syndrome. This disorder causes the body’s immune system to attack its own nerves, leaving the patient paralyzed.

Braham is re-learning how to do basic tasks, such as walking, washing himself and brushing his teeth, and is happy that he has been able to return home to his family. Read more about his harrowing story here.

Purdue University developing new treatment options for autoimmune diseases

Purdue University researchers have developed a series of molecules to help provide symptom relief to those with autoimmune conditions.

Mark Cushman, a distinguished professor of medicinal chemistry at the university, was the lead researcher in the study. His research team found that the molecules are more effective than pharmaceuticals currently on the market at affecting cell signaling and inhibiting autoimmune reactions. They have also shown to produce less side effects than conventional treatments.

Read more about this exciting discovery here.

MSU student shares her story with Alopecia

Payton Bland, a freshman student at Minot State University (MSU) in North Dakota, shares her story of acceptance and confidence while living with Alopecia.

Alopecia is an autoimmune condition that causes the body to attack its own hair follicles. The result can be extensive hair loss. In the case of Alopecia Universalis, the patient loses 100% of the hair on their body.

Oftentimes, those affected by this disorder suffer from anxiety. Payton, however, is undeterred by her Alopecia. Her bald head might cause her to stand out on campus, but she also stands out because of her upbeat personality and positive attitude.

Payton has spoken with young girls living with the condition, to inspire and empower them that it’s nothing to be ashamed about. She credits her family and faith in helping her stay confident in who she is. Watch her heartening interview here.

Top News in Autoimmunity – Week of Dec. 5, 2018

Sjogren’s non-profit seeks applicants for research grants

The Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) is now accepting applications for research grants. Two distinct awards are being offered: the SSF Pilot Research Award for $25,000 and the SSF High Impact Research Award for $75,000. To view more details and apply, see the SSF website.

Trump administration proposes access barriers to drugs critical to autoimmune patients health

The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) reports that the Trump administration has proposed a Medicare rule that allows for step therapy and prior authorization restrictions. The AARDA states that such a rule would interfere with the patient-physician relationship, and can result in delayed treatment, increased disease activity, loss of function, and potentially irreversible disease progression for Medicare beneficiaries. Read more here.

Sharing the Journey series provides tips on explaining lupus

The Lupus Foundation of America has published a blog series Sharing the Journey to highlight the perspectives and personal experiences of those who struggle with lupus each day. In the series’ latest installment, contributors describe how they explain lupus to family, friends, co-workers, and others. Read their compelling stories here.

MS Society of Canada launches Vitamin D recommendations for MS

The Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society of Canada has released a report detailing Vitamin D recommendations for those living with MS for at-risk populations.

Vitamin D, dubbed the ‘sunshine vitamin’, is produced by our skin through sun exposure, but can also come from other sources such as food (eggs, fortified dairy products, and fish) and supplements. The Society has long funded research on the relationship between Vitamin D levels and MS. The recommendations have been summarized into two reports; one for researchers and healthcare professionals, and another for laypersons. Read more under the Society’s research news.