Top Autoimmune Disease Books to Read in 2020

Have you read any good books lately about autoimmune disease? I am continuously consuming autoimmune-related content, whether it’s blogs, YouTube videos or full-fledged novels. Read on to learn about my favorite autoimmune disease books that you should poke your nose into in 2020!

1. The Autoimmune Epidemic

The Autoimmune Epidemic by journalist Donna Jackson Nakazawa is a thought-provoking read about the potential causes behind many autoimmune conditions. In her book, Jackson Nakazawa theorizes that environmental factors such as pollution, pesticides and other toxins are responsible for the alarming rise in autoimmune diseases over the course of the last few decades. Although not a medical professional or scientist herself, Jackson Nakazawa provides compelling evidence that had me wondering what really triggered my own autoimmune conditions. The author herself has an autoimmune disease called myasthenia gravis that severely affected her mobility. Her book has received praise from numerous acclaimed individuals, including U.S. Senator and Secretary of State John Kerry.

2. An Epidemic of Absence

An Epidemic of Absence by Moises Velasquez-Manoff is another exploratory book about the causes behind autoimmune disease. His main theory is that autoimmune conditions, as well as allergies, are caused by a lack of actual communicable diseases in modern society. In ancient times, our ancestors had to contend with parasites and infectious diseases, like hepatitis A, measles, mumps and tuberculosis, from which they could easily die. However, our modern ‘too-clean’ environment has lead to our immune system attacking a new target – our own bodies – instead. I found that Velasquez-Manoff’s book was a direct contrast to The Autoimmune Epidemic (referenced above), since it posits that autoimmune diseases are caused by an absence of environmental triggers, rather than their presence. The author himself has alopecia universalis, an autoimmune disease that results in total body hair loss.

3. The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principals

The Wahls Protocol by Dr. Terry Wahls is an excellent read. I first heard about Dr. Wahls when I watched her viral TedTalk video, Minding Your Mitochondria, in which she describes the relationship between the body’s gut microbiome and the development of autoimmune disease. In her book, Dr. Wahls, who has multiple sclerosis (MS), details how she went from being wheelchair-bound to competing in a marathon after adopting the principals of her dietary protocol. Before implementing the protocol, her MS continued to worsen, despite receiving excellent treatment from some of the top neurologists in the country. Dr. Wahls also stresses the importance of vitamin D naturally derived from the sun in order to maintain a healthy immune system. Although Dr. Wahls’ advice isn’t 100% proven, her medical background and own track record of success healing herself and others is certainly persuasive.

4. The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook

The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook is the first of several novels penned by Mickey Trescott and co-author Angie Alt. The focus of the book is about the Autoimmune Protocol (AIP), a dietary regimen that involves eating paleo, avoiding gluten and dairy, as well as numerous other foods that could ‘trigger’ an autoimmune reaction. I first read the book when I borrowed it from my local library; I had to wait to read the book though, since it was immensely popular, and I was number 25 on the waiting list! Since then, a family member gifted me with a follow-up book by Trescott, called The Nutrient-Dense Kitchen. The book is chock-full of great recipes that are AIP-friendly. Something I like about Trescott’s books is that they not only provide easy to follow recipes, but actually explain why it is that eating this way can help alleviate autoimmune symptoms for some people, including a deep dive into the science behind leaky gut. Trescott herself has both Celiac disease and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis.

5. The New Sjogren’s Syndrome Handbook

The New Sjogren’s Syndrome Handbook was written by the Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) and edited by a physician familiar with the disease. What I like about this book is that it’s specific to Sjogren’s Syndrome (SJS), which is an autoimmune condition that I have. The book goes into the fundamentals about SJS, including what the disease is, how it is diagnosed, the main symptoms, complications, and treatment options. The one critique I would have for the book is that although it’s called the ‘New’ Sjogren’s Syndrome Handbook, the book was originally written in the 1990’s, so it’s not really new (though the foundation has come out with revised editions since). Overall, I think it’s a great read for a newly-diagnosed patient with Sjogren’s, or a family member/friend of someone with Sjogren’s, so that they can understand more about the disease.

Those are my top 5 autoimmune disease related books! Do you have any favorite novels related to chronic illness, autoimmune disease, or other health-related topics? If so, please share in the comments below!

Top News in Autoimmune Disease – October 20, 2019

Evidence of autoimmune response in patients with autism

Autism impacts 1 in 59 American children by age eight and can seriously impair social skills and communication, and lead to repetitive behaviors and restricted interests. For the first time, a team of Boston, Massachusetts-based physicians and scientists have published a report detailing evidence of an autoimmune response against brain cells in patients with autism.

Matthew Anderson, MD, PhD, was the lead researcher in the study. His team analyzed brain tissues donated through Autism BrainNet, a non-profit tissue bank, and noticed that over two-thirds of the brains examined contained three uncommon characteristics.

Firstly, they noted the accumulation of immune cells surrounding blood vessels in the brain (called perivascular lymphocyte cuffs). Secondly, they found that there were bubbles or blisters (that scientists call blebs) accumulating around these blood vessels. Finally, upon further examination, they found that these blebs contained debris called astrocytes.

These findings are evidence of an autoimmune response and chronic inflammation in the brains of patients with autism. The scientists also compared the autistic brains to those of non-autistic donated tissues, and the presence of these findings in the autistic patients ‘significantly surpassed’ that of the control cases.

Although this study does not definitively prove that autism is an autoimmune disease, it is a first step in finding evidence of an immune response for this neurological condition. Anderson compared his team’s findings to research that multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease caused by the immune system’s destruction of the nerves’ myelin sheath.

To read more about this astonishing study, click here.

Family of woman with scleroderma seeks financial support

Yesenia Garica, 25, of Newhall, Santa Clarita, California, first began experiencing debilitating symptoms five years ago. However, it took years for her to get a diagnosis of scleroderma – an autoimmune condition that primarily affects the skin.

Symptoms of scleroderma include hardened and thickened skin, ulcers and sores on the skin, joint pain, muscle weakness, intolerance to cold, high blood pressure, blood vessel damage, and scarring of the lungs.

Yesenia has been hospitalized six times and had surgery three times this year alone. As a result, she now weighs a mere 74 lbs. Unfortunately, her health insurance does not cover the medication that she is taking to treat her symptoms. As such, her family has set up a GoFundMe campaign so that Yesenia can continue to take the medication and to cover specialized treatment at UCLA. So far, the campaign has raised $4,700 out of the $10,000 goal.

To learn more about Yesenia’s condition and to contribute to her GoFundMe campaign, click here.

Top News in Autoimmune Disease – Sept. 22, 2019

Kim Kardashian West gets an ultrasound of her hand, leading to a ‘painful and scary’ diagnosis.

Kim Kardashian West Discusses ‘Painful and Scary’ Autoimmune Diagnosis

Celebrity and business mogul Kim Kardashian West discussed her recent autoimmune diagnosis on an episode of Keeping Up with the Kardashians. During the episode, Kardashian West visits a doctor with symptoms including pain, swelling and stiffness in her joints. She already has an autoimmune condition called psoriasis that causes red, flaky and scaly patches to appear on her skin, which she had developed at age 25 after catching a cold. Now, at age 38, she was informed that her psoriasis has morphed into psoriatic arthritis.

According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, 125 million people worldwide suffer from psoriasis. Furthermore, it’s estimated that 1 in 5 individuals with psoriasis will develop psoriatic arthritis in their lifetime.

Kardashian West said that her symptoms, including joint pain in her hands, got so bad that she was unable to even pick up a toothbrush. An initial blood test she took came back as positive for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, but it was later shown to be a false positive after a review of her symptoms and getting an ultrasound of her hands.

Despite the harrowing diagnosis, Kardashian West is maintaining a positive attitude, saying “It’s still painful and scary, but I was happy to have a diagnosis. No matter what autoimmune condition I had, I was going to get through it, and they are all manageable with proper care.”

The star also bonded with fellow beauty mogul and fashion model Winnie Harlow, who has an autoimmune condition called vitiligo. As she revealed during a recent interview with Jimmy Fallon, Kardashian West spoke to Harlow for over an hour to get her ‘opinion and advice’ on her autoimmune diagnosis.

To learn more about psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, visit the National Psoriasis Foundation website.

J.K. Rowling has made a multi-million dollar donation to fund MS research, at a clinic named after her late mother

J.K. Rowling Donates Millions to Fund Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Research

J.K. Rowling, renowned author of the Harry Potter book series, has made a generous donation to fund Multiple Sclerosis (MS) research in the U.K.

Her donation, in the amount of 15.3 Million British Pounds (equivalent to $18.8 Million USD), will be used to construct a new facility for the Anne Rowling Clinic at the University of Edinburgh, which is dedicated to MS research.

The Anne Rowling Clinic was established at the Scotland-based university in 2010, when J.K. Rowling had made another generous donation to fund MS research. The clinic was named after her mother, who suffered from MS and passed away due to complications from the disease at the young age of 45.

Rowling has said that she is immensely proud of the work that the clinic has accomplished, and that they are providing “practical, on the ground support and care for people with MS.” The University’s Vice Chancellor, Professor Peter Mathieson, also commented, “We are immensely honored that J. K. Rowling has chosen to continue her support for the Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic. This inspiring donation will fund a whole new generation of researchers who are focused on discovering and delivering better treatments and therapies for patients.”

To learn more about the Anne Rowling Clinic and to view a video of their important work, click here.

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How a 71-year-old man got diagnosed with Autoimmune Encephalitis (AE)

Robert Given was a 71-year-old Accountant who ran his own CPA firm and was heavily involved in his local community. Although he didn’t have any prior history of autoimmune disease, he suddenly found himself impacted by a severe autoimmune condition.

While dining out with friends, Given suddenly slumped over, had a seizure, and urinated on himself. Restaurant patrons helped him to lay on the floor and called an ambulance. By the time the ambulance arrived, he had regained consciousness but was confused, refusing to step into the ambulance until his wife told him to.

After being evaluated by a number of physicians, including an internist and a neurologist, the medical professionals made several interesting discoveries. Given had had a sudden drop in blood pressure that was uncharacteristic for someone with well-controlled high blood pressure like himself. His wife also reported that he was losing his balance, had difficulty sleeping and sometimes had slurred speech. He was also highly talkative, to the point that it appeared to be logorrhea – a constant need to talk, even if the speech is often incoherent and repetitive.

Given had a second seizure, and was once again transported to the hospital. After this second episode, his doctor pondered what condition could possibly cause a sudden onset of both neurological and psychiatric symptoms. He hypothesized that his patient might have either Multiple Sclerosis (MS), or some type of heavy metal toxicity and ordered a round of tests to see if this was the case.

The tests came back negative for MS and heavy metals, and his medical team thought that they had to go back to the drawing board. Suddenly, however, his internist Dr. Hersch realized that he had seen a similar case several years prior; the patient had died, but his test results had revealed that he had autoimmune encephalitis (AE), a group of conditions in which the immune system mistakenly attacks the brain.

Dr. Hersch ordered a new round a tests that confirmed that Robert Given did indeed have a type of autoimmune encephalitis caused by a rogue antibody called CASPR2. Symptoms included fluctuations in blood pressure and heart rate, loss of balance, insomnia, and personality changes, and the majority of patients were men over the age of 65- just like Given!

Given has been receiving treatment for his condition at the Mayo Clinic for the last three years. Due to the difficult nature of this disease, his recovery is slow, but he is relieved to have been diagnosed in time to receive life-saving medication.

The Autoimmune Encephalitis Alliance says that while Given is lucky to have received a diagnosis, their aim is to raise awareness so that others with AE do not have to rely on luck to determine the outcome of the disease.

To read the original story by Dr. Lisa Sanders from the New York Times, click here. Also, check out this trailer for Brain on Fire, a movie based on a real-life story of a woman with AE.

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Top News in Autoimmune Disease – June 1, 2019

Dr. Dale Lee is the Director of the Celiac Disease Program at Seattle Children’s Hospital

Youth Take On Celiac Disease Through Outreach Program

Last month was Celiac Disease Awareness Month. While Celiac is one of the most common autoimmune diseases, experts at the Seattle Children’s Hospital estimate that for every diagnosis, eight cases are overlooked.

As a result, the hospital has put together an outreach program that allows youth with Celiac disease the opportunity to raise awareness, organize support groups, and mentor other youth with the disease.

There are currently 11 youth members on the Celiac Youth Leadership Council (CYLC), and one of their current initiatives is running a gluten-free food drive for a local food bank.

The most common symptoms of Celiac disease include abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, weight loss, nausea, and fatigue. Other symptoms include anemia, joint pain, arthritis, osteoporosis, peripheral neuropathy, seizures, canker sores, skin rashes, fatigue, depression and anxiety. In children, the disease can also cause irritability, stunted growth, delayed puberty, and dental damage.

To learn more, click here.

Asaya Bullock (left) pictured here with his sister, is in grave need of a bone marrow match

7-year-old with Rare Autoimmune Disease Needs Life-saving Bone Marrow

Asaya Bullock, a 7-year-old boy from New York, is searching for a donor willing to donate matching bone marrow.

Asaya was born with a rare, life-threatening autoimmune disease called IPEX syndrome. Symptoms include joint pain, body aches, memory loss, fatigue and stomach problems. Doctors said he had two years to live, but, miraculously, he is still alive seven years later.

A bone marrow transplant would greatly help Asaya’s condition; however, since he is of mixed ancestry (part African part Caribbean), finding a matching donor is proving to be a challenge. According to Be the Match, an organization that operates the world’s largest bone marrow registry, the more genetically diverse an individual is, the more difficult it is to find a matching donor.

To learn more about Asaya’s story and how you can join the Be the Match registry, click here.

Monique Bolland describes her harrowing journey living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Australian Woman Describes Her Journey with Multiple Sclerosis

Monique Bolland, 36, from Australia, shares her story living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

Bolland was first diagnosed with this incurable autoimmune disease when she was just 22. At the time, she didn’t quite comprehend the severity of her diagnosis.

She says that she first realized how bad her MS symptoms were when she was cutting bread and accidentally cut her hand, but didn’t even notice as a result of the nerve damage and numbness caused by the disease.

MS impacts an estimated 2.5 million people worldwide, and 70% of MS patients are female. Symptoms include impaired motor function, numbness, fatigue, heat sensitivity, optic nerve damage, and more.

Bolland says that living a healthy lifestyle is imperative to managing her MS symptoms. This includes consuming a diet rich in vitamins D, B12 and omega-3 fatty acids, reducing stress and inflammation, and staying active. She also gets monthly injections of Tysabri, an immunosuppressive drug. In addition, she launched a nutrition supplement and health product line called Nuzest with her father, which supports MS research.

To learn more about Bolland’s story, click here.

Actress Nicole Beharie reveals autoimmune disease caused her exit from hit show

Actress Nicole Beharie Exits Show due to Autoimmune Disease

Nicole Beharie, famed actress on Fox’s hit show, Sleepy Hollow, confessed to fans on Instagram that she left the show abruptly as a result of an autoimmune disease she has been keeping secret for the last five years.

Although Beharie didn’t reveal the exact autoimmune condition she has, she states that it caused her to experience skin rashes and fluctuations in her weight. As a result, her character on the show, FBI agent Abby Mills, was killed off in the season 3 finale, allowing her to take a much-needed break for her health.

Beharie says setting boundaries and limitations, as well as changing her diet, were key to improving her physical and mental state.

To read more about her story, click here.

Travis Frederick missed an entire NFL football season as a result of his autoimmune disease

Dallas Cowboys Frontman Tackles Autoimmune Condition and Injuries

Travis Frederick, the Dallas Cowboys’ all-star center, revealed that he suffers from an autoimmune condition called Guillain-Barre syndrome. This caused him to miss playing an entire NFL football season, while a backup played in his place. He also revealed he had two surgeries during this time.

Frederick is now expected to return to the starting lineup this upcoming season. However, since he is still experiencing lingering effects of Guillain-Barre, he is being brought back on to the field slowly.

To learn more about Frederick’s story, click here.

Is there a link between diet and autoimmune disease?

About 8 years ago, I saw a powerful TedTalk by Dr. Terry Wahls, called Minding Your Mitochondria.

Dr. Wahls is a physician who was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, a degenerative autoimmune disease affecting the body’s nervous system. After undergoing traditional therapies for the condition, including chemotherapy and usage of a tilt-recline wheelchair, Dr. Wahls studied biochemistry and learned about the nutrients that played a role in maintaining brain health.

After noticing a slow down in the progression of her disease after taking nutritional supplements, she decided to focus her diet on consuming foods that contained these brain-protecting nutrients. Only a year after beginning her new diet, Dr. Wahls was not only out of her wheelchair, but she had just finished her first 18-mile bike tour! She went on to develop a dietary regimen for those with autoimmune conditions, called the Wahls Protocol.

So, this raises the question, does diet play a role in the development of (and fight against) autoimmune disease?

There is evidence to suggest that there is a link between autoimmunity and one’s diet. For example, I recently wrote about a study published by NYU’s School of Medicine, in which researchers found that the autoimmune disease lupus is strongly linked to imbalances in the gut’s microbiome.

Furthermore, the Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society of Canada also released a report detailing Vitamin D recommendations for MS patients, as a result of studies linking Vitamin D deficiency to the disease. Vitamin D is produced by our skin through sun exposure, but also comes from food sources such as fish, dairy and eggs.

Tara Grant, who has a condition called Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS), an autoimmune condition of the skin, believes that there is a direct link between autoimmunity and diet, as a result of a concept called leaky gut syndrome.

Leaky gut syndrome, also known as intestinal permeability, occurs when the tight junctions between cells in the body’s digestive tract begin to loosen. This enables substances like bacteria, toxins and undigested food particles to enter your bloodstream. Consequently, your immune system reacts to attack these foreign substances, which leads to the development of inflammation and autoimmune disease.

After implementing a restrictive, dairy-free, gluten-free paleo diet, Tara has found that her HS symptoms have completely gone into remission. She now promotes the paleo lifestle on her blog, PrimalGirl, and even released a book, The Hidden Plague, which talks about her struggle treating HS through traditional means, and her journey to healing.

Now I’d like to hear from you Autoimmune Warriors- has changing your diet impacted your chronic health condition in any way? What changes have you implemented that have worked?

Learn More

To read more about the Wahls Protocol, check out Dr. Wahls’ website, and click here to get her book on Amazon.

To read more about Tara Grant’s journey to being HS-free, click here to get her book on Amazon, and check out her amazing gluten-free dough recipe, here.