Top News in Autoimmune Disease – June 15, 2019

Girl with Autoimmune Disease Creates Teddy Bears that Hide IV Bags

Medi-Teddies are designed to hide IV bags for children receive intravenous treatments

Ella Casano was diagnosed with an autoimmune condition called Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia Purpura (ITP) when she was just 7 years old. ITP is known to cause low platelet levels, excessive bruising and bleeding.

Now 12 years old, Ella receives IV infusions every 8 weeks to ease the symptoms of her condition. As part of a class project, she had to come up with a business idea, and, thinking about her experience with IV infusions and how scary the medical equipment can look to children, she came up with the idea of the “Medi-Teddy”, a teddy bear that hides IV bags.

Ella’s family started a GoFundMe page to raise $5,000 to provide 500 Medi-Teddies to kids in need. For more on this story and to learn how you can donate, click here.

British Columbia Mother Sues Over Breast Implant Risks

Samara Bunsko is involved in a class action lawsuit alleging her breast implants made her sick.

Samara Bunsko, 28, of Maple Ridge, British Columbia, Canada, is suing breast implant manufacturer Allergan over allegations that her implants caused her to develop various health issues, including hair loss, irregular thyroid and iron levels, headaches, fatigue and cysts.

Samara is the lead plaintiff in two proposed class action lawsuits against breast implant manufacturers, alleging that they did not disclose the risk of developing certain cancers or autoimmune diseases as a result of the implants.

Dr. Jan Tervaert, Director of Rheumatology at the University of Alberta’s School of Medicine, says that research shows that patients with a genetic predisposition for autoimmune disease have the highest risk of developing symptoms. Furthermore, patients who have had implants the longest are the least likely to experience a cessation in their symptoms once the implants are removed.

Health Canada is conducting a safety review of systemic symptoms caused by breast implants, including the development of autoimmune conditions. To learn more, click here.

Amy Hoey has five different autoimmune diseases, none of which have a cure.

Woman Describes her Experience with Multiple Autoimmune Diseases

Amy Hoey was a young teen when she began to experience a myriad of symptoms, including severely dry skin and body aches. She was told by professionals that she was likely just experiencing eczema and growing pains, when in fact, she had an autoimmune condition called psoriasis. Psoriasis can affect the joints and develop into psoriatic arthritis, which is what happened to Amy.

Later, Amy began to experience extreme fatigue, hair loss, kidney infections and chest pain. She went on to receive a diagnosis of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, an autoimmune condition in which the immune system attacks the thyroid gland.

She started to experience even more symptoms, including a butterfly-shaped rash on her face, mouth ulcers, and memory loss, which lead to the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Lupus causes damage to the body’s internal organs, skin and joints.

To top it off, Amy also has celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system damages the small intestine in response to consuming gluten, the protein found in wheat.

Amy felt like she constantly had the flu. Worse still, the physicians she worked with seemed to know little about autoimmune conditions, and one even Googled her conditions in front of her! She also has had allergic reactions to medications used to treat autoimmune disease, and also has a genetic condition that makes her more susceptible to infections, which can be a challenge, since many autoimmune treatments work by suppressing the immune system.

Amy says her best advice is to focus on what you can do, not what you can’t do. While she had a difficult time accepting this at first, since she used to be an athlete, maintaining a positive attitude and working with a knowledgeable rheumatologist have been helpful for her treatment.

To read more about Amy’s story, click here.



Top News in Autoimmune Disease – June 1, 2019

Dr. Dale Lee is the Director of the Celiac Disease Program at Seattle Children’s Hospital

Youth Take On Celiac Disease Through Outreach Program

Last month was Celiac Disease Awareness Month. While Celiac is one of the most common autoimmune diseases, experts at the Seattle Children’s Hospital estimate that for every diagnosis, eight cases are overlooked.

As a result, the hospital has put together an outreach program that allows youth with Celiac disease the opportunity to raise awareness, organize support groups, and mentor other youth with the disease.

There are currently 11 youth members on the Celiac Youth Leadership Council (CYLC), and one of their current initiatives is running a gluten-free food drive for a local food bank.

The most common symptoms of Celiac disease include abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, weight loss, nausea, and fatigue. Other symptoms include anemia, joint pain, arthritis, osteoporosis, peripheral neuropathy, seizures, canker sores, skin rashes, fatigue, depression and anxiety. In children, the disease can also cause irritability, stunted growth, delayed puberty, and dental damage.

To learn more, click here.

Asaya Bullock (left) pictured here with his sister, is in grave need of a bone marrow match

7-year-old with Rare Autoimmune Disease Needs Life-saving Bone Marrow

Asaya Bullock, a 7-year-old boy from New York, is searching for a donor willing to donate matching bone marrow.

Asaya was born with a rare, life-threatening autoimmune disease called IPEX syndrome. Symptoms include joint pain, body aches, memory loss, fatigue and stomach problems. Doctors said he had two years to live, but, miraculously, he is still alive seven years later.

A bone marrow transplant would greatly help Asaya’s condition; however, since he is of mixed ancestry (part African part Caribbean), finding a matching donor is proving to be a challenge. According to Be the Match, an organization that operates the world’s largest bone marrow registry, the more genetically diverse an individual is, the more difficult it is to find a matching donor.

To learn more about Asaya’s story and how you can join the Be the Match registry, click here.

Monique Bolland describes her harrowing journey living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS)

Australian Woman Describes Her Journey with Multiple Sclerosis

Monique Bolland, 36, from Australia, shares her story living with Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

Bolland was first diagnosed with this incurable autoimmune disease when she was just 22. At the time, she didn’t quite comprehend the severity of her diagnosis.

She says that she first realized how bad her MS symptoms were when she was cutting bread and accidentally cut her hand, but didn’t even notice as a result of the nerve damage and numbness caused by the disease.

MS impacts an estimated 2.5 million people worldwide, and 70% of MS patients are female. Symptoms include impaired motor function, numbness, fatigue, heat sensitivity, optic nerve damage, and more.

Bolland says that living a healthy lifestyle is imperative to managing her MS symptoms. This includes consuming a diet rich in vitamins D, B12 and omega-3 fatty acids, reducing stress and inflammation, and staying active. She also gets monthly injections of Tysabri, an immunosuppressive drug. In addition, she launched a nutrition supplement and health product line called Nuzest with her father, which supports MS research.

To learn more about Bolland’s story, click here.

Actress Nicole Beharie reveals autoimmune disease caused her exit from hit show

Actress Nicole Beharie Exits Show due to Autoimmune Disease

Nicole Beharie, famed actress on Fox’s hit show, Sleepy Hollow, confessed to fans on Instagram that she left the show abruptly as a result of an autoimmune disease she has been keeping secret for the last five years.

Although Beharie didn’t reveal the exact autoimmune condition she has, she states that it caused her to experience skin rashes and fluctuations in her weight. As a result, her character on the show, FBI agent Abby Mills, was killed off in the season 3 finale, allowing her to take a much-needed break for her health.

Beharie says setting boundaries and limitations, as well as changing her diet, were key to improving her physical and mental state.

To read more about her story, click here.

Travis Frederick missed an entire NFL football season as a result of his autoimmune disease

Dallas Cowboys Frontman Tackles Autoimmune Condition and Injuries

Travis Frederick, the Dallas Cowboys’ all-star center, revealed that he suffers from an autoimmune condition called Guillain-Barre syndrome. This caused him to miss playing an entire NFL football season, while a backup played in his place. He also revealed he had two surgeries during this time.

Frederick is now expected to return to the starting lineup this upcoming season. However, since he is still experiencing lingering effects of Guillain-Barre, he is being brought back on to the field slowly.

To learn more about Frederick’s story, click here.

Top News in Autoimmune Disease – May 15, 2019

Type 1 Diabetes Patients Drive to Canada for Affordable Insulin


Lija Greenseid of Minnesota holds up insulin for her 13-year-old daughter that she purchased from Fort Francis, Ontario during an organized caravan ride to Canada. 

Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system attacks and destroys pancreatic cells, rendering them incapable of producing insulin. Insulin is a hormone that the body needs to get glucose from the bloodstream into its cells. As a result, patients with Type 1 Diabetes rely on prescription insulin in order to survive.

Unfortunately, for the majority of Americans, the cost of life-saving insulin keeps going up year after year. As a result, Quinn Nystrom, from Minnesota, organized a caravan to Canada to fill her prescription for insulin, where it sells for a fraction of the cost.

As reported by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), insulin costs significantly less in Canada, thanks to the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board, which sets limits for the maximum price that can be charged for patented drugs. As a result, a vial of insulin that costs $300 in the US is only $30 in Canada, even when it comes from the same brand.

Many patients who cannot afford their medication will ration their insulin. Unfortunately, as a result of not taking the required minimum dose, patients who ‘ration’ their insulin can die.

That’s what happened to Alec Smith-Holt, a 26-year-old man from Minnesota who died in 2017 when he couldn’t afford $1,300 in insulin, and decided to ration his remaining supply. His body was discovered five days later. His mother, Nicole Smith-Holt, joined the caravan to Canada as a symbolic gesture in memory of her son.

To read more about this story, click here.

Executive Gets Purple Mohawk to Benefit Kid with Autoimmune Disease

Cayden Krueger, a young patient with ITP, poses with John Stevenson, who is supporting his Pump it Up for Platelets campaign.

Cayden Krueger, from Madison, Wisconsin, was diagnosed with thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) when he was just 6 years old. ITP is an autoimmune disease that causes patients to have too few platelets in their blood, resulting in easy bruising and bleeding. Cayden has been raising awareness about ITP by launching a Pump it Up for Platelets fundraiser and sporting a purple mohawk.

When John Stevenson, a Senior Director of Financial Services at US Cellular, heard about Cayden’s story, he challenged his employees to raise money for the Pump it Up for Platelets fundraiser, and pledged to get a purple mohawk himself if they could meet a $1,000 goal. His team ended up raising $2,000, so Stevenson found himself with a new hairdo, and Cayden even got to make the first cut.

To read more about this story, click here.

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Working with a chronic illness

Working with a chronic health condition can be a challenge. Sometimes, you may not feel ‘up to’ working, but you still have to put in a full day on the job. There are times when you feel sick— but perhaps not sick enough to warrant taking a sick day. Even if you do take time off, there may be judgments from co-workers that don’t believe that what you’re going through is real, especially invisible illness symptoms, such as pain.

When looking back through my life, I can see various ways in which my chronic illness, Sjögren’s Syndrome, has impacted my work. For example, I experience significant joint pain after doing hours’ worth of typing. Also, the stale office air worsens my dry eye and mouth symptoms, causing me to use copious amounts of eye drops and saliva-stimulating medications. Also, debilitating fatigue affects my energy levels and impacts my ability to produce as much as I want to.

As a result, I have had to adjust my lifestyle in order to stay healthy and maintain my productivity while on the job. Here are a few tips that have helped me:

  • Getting a good night’s rest – Before being diagnosed with Sjögren’s, I could get 4-5 hours of sleep per night, and still be productive and alert throughout the day. But no more. I must get at least 7-8 hours’ worth of solid rest to help combat against disease-related fatigue.
  • Being mindful of my eating habits – With a chronic health condition, I need to be extra mindful of what I’m putting into my body. While others may be able to sustain themselves on caffeine and sweets- I know that doing likewise isn’t going to make my body feel any better; so I pack a healthy lunch, and choose the healthy option when I eat out.
  • Organizing my treatment plan – I think it’s extremely important to be organized when you have a chronic illness. For example, I record my doctor’s appointments on my calendar and stay on top of taking my medications and supplements, which it vital to treating my symptoms.
  • Staying active – Exercising, while also holding down a job and managing my chronic illness, can be a challenge. However, I know it’s important to stay active, because it makes my body stronger and more resilient, and I’m able to complete tasks using less energy as a result. So, I go to the gym and take walks around my neighborhood and in the business park on my lunch break at least a few times a week.

When you have to leave your job

I recently started following a YouTuber by the name of Samantha Wayne. In her YouTube channel, called Live, Hope, Lupus, she discusses having to leave her full-time job as a result of her autoimmune condition. You can check out the video here.

Having to leave a job due to health reasons can be devastating. In addition to the financial benefit of having a job, many individuals (especially Americans) rely on their job to pay at least partially for their costly health insurance premiums. I have found that there is also a psychological benefit to having a job; it gives me confidence, makes me feel like I am ‘valuable’ and helping others, and feel like I am a productive member of society. Although one shouldn’t rely solely on a job for their self-esteem, I do believe that it’s a contributing factor.

In Samantha’s case, she transitioned to several part-time business and work opportunities in order to earn a living, and have more time and flexibility to manage her lupus and Sjögren’s symptoms. Exploring other work alternatives, such as freelancing, part-time and contract work, or starting your own business, might be an ideal way to balance both your health and financial commitments.

Final Thoughts

If you are finding it challenging to keep up with managing both your chronic health condition, work and other life demands, I would encourage you to implement the tips above to see if it makes a positive difference. Don’t let your disease get in the way of accomplishing your dreams and goals!

How do you manage your chronic illness while working? Has your health impacted your ability to do your job? Do you have any additional health management tips? Comment below!

 

Top News in Autoimmunity – Week of Dec. 19, 2018

NMO

Edmonton fighter diagnosed with rare disease

Victor Valimaki, a 37-year old professional fighter from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, was left crippled by a rare autoimmune disorder.

Although Valimaki has fought in over two dozen professional fights, leading him to a successful career as an Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) mixed-martial arts fighter, he was recently diagnosed with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), otherwise known as Devic’s disease.

This autoimmune condition affects the body’s optic nerves, spinal cord and brain. For Valimaki, the disease caused him to lose his vision, speech, and ability to walk. Although he has since regained his sight, he is still struggling with the other consequences of the disorder.

Read his full story and watch the video on CTV News Edmonton.

Italian biotech company raises 17M€ to fund gene therapies for autoimmune diseases

An Italian biotechnology company named Altheia raised over 17 million euros this week to fund gene therapies that could potentially treat many incurable autoimmune diseases.

The company’s technology, which uses gene therapy to engineer bone marrow stem cells to express a molecule called PD-L1 that inactivates the immune system’s T cells. In other words, the molecule released will ‘hit the breaks’ on the body’s immune system, avoiding an immune system attack on healthy tissue.

Paolo Rizzardi, the company’s CEO, has stated that he expects clinical trials for autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes to begin in 2021.

Read more about this exciting new development on LABIOTECH.eu.

 

 

 

Top News in Autoimmunity – Week of Dec. 12, 2018

Man left paralyzed from the nose down by rare autoimmune disorder

David Braham, a 40-year old man from the United Kingdom, came down with a bad case of food poisoning, which he believes was triggered by eating chicken curry. A few days later, he was in the hospital being put into an induced coma.

It turns out, the food poisoning had caused him to develop a rare autoimmune condition called Guillain-Barre Syndrome. This disorder causes the body’s immune system to attack its own nerves, leaving the patient paralyzed.

Braham is re-learning how to do basic tasks, such as walking, washing himself and brushing his teeth, and is happy that he has been able to return home to his family. Read more about his harrowing story here.

Purdue University developing new treatment options for autoimmune diseases

Purdue University researchers have developed a series of molecules to help provide symptom relief to those with autoimmune conditions.

Mark Cushman, a distinguished professor of medicinal chemistry at the university, was the lead researcher in the study. His research team found that the molecules are more effective than pharmaceuticals currently on the market at affecting cell signaling and inhibiting autoimmune reactions. They have also shown to produce less side effects than conventional treatments.

Read more about this exciting discovery here.

MSU student shares her story with Alopecia

Payton Bland, a freshman student at Minot State University (MSU) in North Dakota, shares her story of acceptance and confidence while living with Alopecia.

Alopecia is an autoimmune condition that causes the body to attack its own hair follicles. The result can be extensive hair loss. In the case of Alopecia Universalis, the patient loses 100% of the hair on their body.

Oftentimes, those affected by this disorder suffer from anxiety. Payton, however, is undeterred by her Alopecia. Her bald head might cause her to stand out on campus, but she also stands out because of her upbeat personality and positive attitude.

Payton has spoken with young girls living with the condition, to inspire and empower them that it’s nothing to be ashamed about. She credits her family and faith in helping her stay confident in who she is. Watch her heartening interview here.

Top News in Autoimmunity – Week of Dec. 5, 2018

Sjogren’s non-profit seeks applicants for research grants

The Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) is now accepting applications for research grants. Two distinct awards are being offered: the SSF Pilot Research Award for $25,000 and the SSF High Impact Research Award for $75,000. To view more details and apply, see the SSF website.

Trump administration proposes access barriers to drugs critical to autoimmune patients health

The American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) reports that the Trump administration has proposed a Medicare rule that allows for step therapy and prior authorization restrictions. The AARDA states that such a rule would interfere with the patient-physician relationship, and can result in delayed treatment, increased disease activity, loss of function, and potentially irreversible disease progression for Medicare beneficiaries. Read more here.

Sharing the Journey series provides tips on explaining lupus

The Lupus Foundation of America has published a blog series Sharing the Journey to highlight the perspectives and personal experiences of those who struggle with lupus each day. In the series’ latest installment, contributors describe how they explain lupus to family, friends, co-workers, and others. Read their compelling stories here.

MS Society of Canada launches Vitamin D recommendations for MS

The Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society of Canada has released a report detailing Vitamin D recommendations for those living with MS for at-risk populations.

Vitamin D, dubbed the ‘sunshine vitamin’, is produced by our skin through sun exposure, but can also come from other sources such as food (eggs, fortified dairy products, and fish) and supplements. The Society has long funded research on the relationship between Vitamin D levels and MS. The recommendations have been summarized into two reports; one for researchers and healthcare professionals, and another for laypersons. Read more under the Society’s research news.