8-Year-Old Who Died from Autoimmune Diseases Leaves Legacy List of Rules

Ellie Pruitt was an 8-year-old girl who left a legacy of wisdom after passing from autoimmune diseases

Ellie Pruitt was an 8-year-old girl from Canton, Georgia, who passed away from various autoimmune diseases.

When Ellie was just three years old, she began to complain of pains in her legs and fatigue. Ellie’s parents took her to a Pediatric Rheumatologist who confirmed that she had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune condition causing painful inflammation in the joints. She took steroids and received injections of methotrexate, a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug designed to reduce the inflammation.

During Ellie’s short lifetime, she participated in medical studies to determine what causes autoimmune disease. Both of her parents, Heather and Chuck Pruitt, have autoimmune conditions themselves; Heather was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was a college senior, and Chuck was diagnosed with lupus at age 15.

In addition to the medical studies, Ellie and her family participated in the Walk to Cure Arthritis. They formed a team of families representing four children with the condition, called the Woodstock Warriors Against Juvenile Arthritis. Their team raised more than $5,000 for the cause.

Ellie participated in the Walk to Cure Arthritis with her family

After Ellie passed away on February 6th, her parents found a list of ‘rules to live by‘ that she had written. The rules were: 1) Have fun 2) No fighting 3) No pushing, shoving or hitting, and 4) Always love. After her parents found the list of rules, they decided to share it with her classmates to help comfort them after her passing.

Ellie Pruitt’s list of rules to live by

“It’s amazing that an 8-year-old little girl knew what we should focus on,” her mother Heather Pruitt said. “She started [rule] number 5, but erased it, because she knew that’s the greatest…If you can do all those things, you’re going to be in good shape.”

As a tribute to young Ellie’s wisdom, her hometown decided to display her list of rules in various places around their community. Local businesses like Bruster’s and Chick-fil-A displayed rules 1 and 4 on signage outside their stores.

Chick-fil-A displays a sign with two of Ellie’s rules on it

According to Ellie’s obituary, she was very artistic and loved to do crafts, draw, and paint. She was also a dancer and a musician (she played the piano). Her favorite places were school, church and the beach.

If you enjoyed reading about Ellie’s story, please don’t forget to like, share and comment below! Also, subscribe for more autoimmune disease news.

Endometriosis linked to common autoimmune diseases

Endometriosis image courtesy of: The Endometriosis Foundation of America

A group of Italian researchers based out of Sapienza University in Rome have discovered a link between endometriosis and several common autoimmune diseases.

According to the Endometriosis Foundation of America, endometriosis is a menstruation-related disease that primarily affects women in their reproductive years. The disease occurs when tissue similar to the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) migrates outside of the womb, where it shouldn’t be. This results in a variety of symptoms, including inflammation, severe cramping and pain, long, heavy periods, and infertility. It can also cause other symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, bowel and urinary disorders, chronic fatigue and pain during sexual activity.

The exact cause of endometriosis is poorly understood. While many theories have been suggested, this study investigated the prevalence of common autoimmune diseases among Italian women with endometriosis. The study compared 148 women with endometriosis (the case group) to 150 who did not have the condition (the control group). The women in the study ranged from 18-45 years of age, and those who had endometriosis suffered from varying degrees of the disease.

The study found that in the case group, there was a ‘significantly higher’ prevalence of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), celiac disease, and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, as compared to the control group not affected by endometriosis. Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), however, was not found to be linked with endometriosis.

The main limitation of this study is the small sample size. Further studies must be done with a larger group in order to prove that autoimmune activity is responsible for the development of endometriosis. However, this study is helpful for physicians to consider the possibility of autoimmune conditions that may be co-occurring in patients with endometriosis.

To learn more about endometriosis, visit the Endometriosis Foundation of America website.

This blog post is dedicated to Jenni Rempel, a classmate of mine who passed away from endometriosis four years ago. Before she passed away, Jenni produced this video to educate others about this painful disease: Help Me Get My Life Back from Endometriosis.

Evidence of Autoimmune Response in Patients with Autism; Family of Woman with Scleroderma Seeks Financial Support

Evidence of autoimmune response in patients with autism

Autism impacts 1 in 59 American children by age eight and can seriously impair social skills and communication, and lead to repetitive behaviors and restricted interests. For the first time, a team of Boston, Massachusetts-based physicians and scientists have published a report detailing evidence of an autoimmune response against brain cells in patients with autism.

Matthew Anderson, MD, PhD, was the lead researcher in the study. His team analyzed brain tissues donated through Autism BrainNet, a non-profit tissue bank, and noticed that over two-thirds of the brains examined contained three uncommon characteristics.

Firstly, they noted the accumulation of immune cells surrounding blood vessels in the brain (called perivascular lymphocyte cuffs). Secondly, they found that there were bubbles or blisters (that scientists call blebs) accumulating around these blood vessels. Finally, upon further examination, they found that these blebs contained debris called astrocytes.

These findings are evidence of an autoimmune response and chronic inflammation in the brains of patients with autism. The scientists also compared the autistic brains to those of non-autistic donated tissues, and the presence of these findings in the autistic patients ‘significantly surpassed’ that of the control cases.

Although this study does not definitively prove that autism is an autoimmune disease, it is a first step in finding evidence of an immune response for this neurological condition. Anderson compared his team’s findings to research that multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease caused by the immune system’s destruction of the nerves’ myelin sheath.

To read more about this astonishing study, click here.

Family of woman with scleroderma seeks financial support

Yesenia Garica, 25, of Newhall, Santa Clarita, California, first began experiencing debilitating symptoms five years ago. However, it took years for her to get a diagnosis of scleroderma – an autoimmune condition that primarily affects the skin.

Symptoms of scleroderma include hardened and thickened skin, ulcers and sores on the skin, joint pain, muscle weakness, intolerance to cold, high blood pressure, blood vessel damage, and scarring of the lungs.

Yesenia has been hospitalized six times and had surgery three times this year alone. As a result, she now weighs a mere 74 lbs. Unfortunately, her health insurance does not cover the medication that she is taking to treat her symptoms. As such, her family has set up a GoFundMe campaign so that Yesenia can continue to take the medication and to cover specialized treatment at UCLA. So far, the campaign has raised $4,700 out of the $10,000 goal.

To learn more about Yesenia’s condition and to contribute to her GoFundMe campaign, click here.