Queen Latifah Raises Awareness about Scleroderma

Queen Latifah with her mother, Rita Owens, who passed away in 2018 after a five-year battle with Scleroderma. Photo credit: Johnny Nunez.

Queen Latifah, an actress, producer and singer, has become an advocate for those living with scleroderma after losing her mother, Rita Owens, to the disease in 2018.

Scleroderma, or systemic sclerosis, is an autoimmune disease that translates from Greek to ‘hard skin’, since hardening of the skin is one of the most visible manifestations of the disease, according to the Scleroderma Foundation. Symptoms of scleroderma can vary widely from person to person, and its effects can range from mild to life threatening. One of the most life threatening effects of scleroderma is that it can cause tissues on major organs to harden. In approximately 25% of patients, scleroderma results in interstitial lung disease, which causes scarring of the lungs and makes it difficult to breathe, which may also be fatal for the patient.

Unfortunately, this is what happened to Rita Owens. A lifelong educator, she passed out when teaching in her classroom. Though she had experienced shortness of breath and dry cough for a while, her family had thought it was just a result of her getting older. It wasn’t until she fainted in front of her students that various tests were done and specialists consulted, when she was finally diagnosed with systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD).

Before her passing, Rita Owens was one of approximately 300,000 Americans who suffer from Scleroderma.

In an interview with Good Housekeeping, Latifah said that the diagnosis came as a total shock to her family, saying, “That was terrifying because now we had to figure out, ‘what does it mean to have this autoimmune disease?’ I had never heard of scleroderma before.”

According to the Scleroderma Foundation, scleroderma affects an estimated 300,000 Americans. It’s onset is most frequent between the ages of 25 and 55, and women are four times more likely to have the disease than men. Localized scleroderma is more common in children, whereas adults are more likely to suffer from the systemic version of the disease that is more widespread in the body. Though the exact cause of the disease is unknown, it’s believed that genetic factors can make one more susceptible to the disease, and that it involves an overproduction of collagen.

Since little is known about the disease, Latifah is partnering with Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals to raise awareness as part of the More Than Scleroderma campaign. “The right information and resources are out there and you can start by visiting SclerodermaILD.com. My hope is that I can help make others’ journey with SSc-ILD a little less challenging.”

Though Latifah was devastated to lose her mother after a five-year battle with the disease, she hopes to make a difference in her memory. “I found that knowledge is power when it came to managing my mom’s health, and I want to share what I’ve learned to help others. Anything my mom could do to help someone else have an easier journey, she wanted to be a part of – so it’s important for me to carry on my mom’s mission,” she explained.

To learn more about Scleroderma, visit the Scleroderma Foundation website.

Professional Soccer Player Describes Life with Autoimmune Diseases

Shannon Boxx, a professional women’s soccer player, secretly battled two autoimmune diseases while winning medals across the globe

Playing Professionally with Invisible Illnesses

In 2012, Shannon Boxx, a professional soccer player on the US national women’s team, was at the top of her career. She had earned medals at three World Cup games and two Olympic gold medals. However, unbeknownst to her teammates and coaches, she had actually been diagnosed with a debilitating autoimmune disease a decade prior, and another autoimmune disease just four years ago.

Boxx, now 42, was first diagnosed with Sjogren’s Syndrome in 2002, which causes widespread dryness, joint pain and fatigue, among other symptoms. She was later diagnosed in 2008 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), or simply, lupus, which also causes a myriad of symptoms, including joint pain, muscle pain, fatigue, skin rashes, brain fog and major organ involvement.

Treatment for Lupus and Sjogren’s Symptoms

When interviewed by the publication The Undefeated, Boxx said that she manages her lupus flares by wearing compression pants, which help with the joint pain that she experiences in her knees. She also takes hydroxychloroquine, also known as Plaquenil, an anti-malarial drug that helps her to manage the joint pain associated with both of her autoimmune conditions. Boxx describes her joint pain as severe; “There were times, even when I was playing on the national team, I was having teammates cut my steak for me because it hurt so much on my wrist to actually hold onto a fork or a knife.”

Fatigue and brain fog are other symptoms that Boxx battles daily. “I used to be able to run forever, and now I can barely walk sometimes for a mile or two. And that’s pretty heartbreaking,” she confessed. Boxx has children, and she wants to be able to run around with her kids for as long as possible. “To know that there’s days that I can’t do it, it puts you in a really bad place, mentally,” she said. When asked about how the fatigue feels, she commented, “It is this feeling of a weight just sitting on you and just even to lift your head off the pillow takes so much effort and your eyes don’t want to open. When I was playing it felt like my feet were in quicksand.”

Autoimmune Disease Triggers

Boxx explained that one of the main triggers for her autoimmune flares is stress. Now that the coronavirus is grappling the world, the global pandemic has added another layer of anxiety to the mix, especially given that she is immunocompromised. As a result, the professional athlete is following local shelter-in-place orders, wearing masks diligently and ensuring to frequently wash her hands and stay six feet apart from others.

Another source of anxiety is the fact that hydroxychloroquine, the medication that she takes, has become more scarce as a result of it being explored for its potential use in treating COVID-19. “It makes me sad that there are a lot of people that are suffering or even worse because they now can’t get the medication that they need,” she said.

Boxx believes another potential source of her flares is over-exposure to the sun, though thankfully, most days are overcast in her home of Portland, Oregon in the Pacific Northwest. She also frequently experiences the so-called ‘butterfly rash‘ that is a hallmark of lupus, and can arise following exposure to sunlight.

Two other factors that must be considered in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease are sex and race. According to the Sjogren’s Foundation, nine out of 10 Sjogren’s patients are women; similarly, the US National Library of Medicine states that nine out of 10 lupus patients are women. Lupus is also three times more likely to occur in African American women than white women. Boxx, for her part, is a biracial woman, so her gender and ethnic background may have played a part in developing autoimmune diseases.

Moving Forward with Chronic Illness

Shannon Boxx plays in a friendly soccer match against Brazil’s women’s team.

Though living with two different autoimmune conditions is undeniably challenging, Shannon Boxx is determined to live her best life. She retired from playing professional soccer in 2015, and is focusing on taking care of her own health, and spending time with her husband and kids. Though she has retired from professional soccer, she enjoys playing non-competitive games with other international teams and coaching kids’ soccer teams.

Boxx is also an advocate for those living with chronic illnesses, and actively participates in awareness campaigns for the Lupus Foundation of America. Commenting on her conditions, she said, “I’ve been able to deal with it, and still do something that I love…[lupus] has shown me that I can’t take [soccer] for granted, because that’s something that I love to do. If anything it’s given me perspective.”

10-Year-Old Battling Autoimmune Disease Becomes Special Deputy

Caleb Anderson, Special Deputy for Boone County, is battling an autoimmune disease

Caleb Anderson, a 10-year-old boy from the Indianapolis, Indiana area, has become the newest member of the Boone County Sheriff’s Office.

Caleb, who is battling an autoimmune disease, wants to be a K-9 handler when he grows up. As such, the Boone County Sheriff’s Office wanted to surprise Caleb by swearing him in and deputizing him as a Special Deputy. At the swearing in ceremony, Caleb got to meet K-9 Deputies Clint Stewart and Taylor Nielsen, along with their trusted K-9 partners, Makya and Arco. Nelson Uniforms also donated a full uniform and tactical boots for Caleb to wear.

Caleb Anderson meets K-9 handlers and their K-9 partners at the Boone County Sheriff’s Office

Sheriff Nielsen commented, “Caleb’s theme is ‘Fight Courageously’, we can all learn from this.” He continued, “We have learned from Caleb that when we are faced with difficulties in life that we fight with everything we have. Keep fighting Deputy Caleb, we will always be in your corner.”

Sue Anderson, Caleb’s mother, said that Caleb currently attends Connections Academy, an online school. She explained, “Since Caleb is immune suppressed he can’t go into a classroom setting due to the risk of infection for him.”

Anderson explained that she was connected with the Sheriff’s Department when Caleb had the opportunity to meet up with Deputy Nielsen to do K9 training, and from there, was introduced to all of the amazing people at the Boone County Sheriff’s Office. “Caleb dreams about being a K9 handler one day and is a little shadow to the Sheriff and Deputy Nielsen,” she said.

The Autoimmune Warrior team is so happy to see that Caleb is realizing his dreams of becoming a K9 handler! Battling an autoimmune disease is never easy, and especially challenging as a child. Thank you, Caleb, for being an inspiration to us all.

To watch Caleb’s swearing in ceremony, check out the video on Boone County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page.

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