Top News in Autoimmunity – Week of Dec. 12, 2018

Man left paralyzed from the nose down by rare autoimmune disorder

David Braham, a 40-year old man from the United Kingdom, came down with a bad case of food poisoning, which he believes was triggered by eating chicken curry. A few days later, he was in the hospital being put into an induced coma.

It turns out, the food poisoning had caused him to develop a rare autoimmune condition called Guillain-Barre Syndrome. This disorder causes the body’s immune system to attack its own nerves, leaving the patient paralyzed.

Braham is re-learning how to do basic tasks, such as walking, washing himself and brushing his teeth, and is happy that he has been able to return home to his family. Read more about his harrowing story here.

Purdue University developing new treatment options for autoimmune diseases

Purdue University researchers have developed a series of molecules to help provide symptom relief to those with autoimmune conditions.

Mark Cushman, a distinguished professor of medicinal chemistry at the university, was the lead researcher in the study. His research team found that the molecules are more effective than pharmaceuticals currently on the market at affecting cell signaling and inhibiting autoimmune reactions. They have also shown to produce less side effects than conventional treatments.

Read more about this exciting discovery here.

MSU student shares her story with Alopecia

Payton Bland, a freshman student at Minot State University (MSU) in North Dakota, shares her story of acceptance and confidence while living with Alopecia.

Alopecia is an autoimmune condition that causes the body to attack its own hair follicles. The result can be extensive hair loss. In the case of Alopecia Universalis, the patient loses 100% of the hair on their body.

Oftentimes, those affected by this disorder suffer from anxiety. Payton, however, is undeterred by her Alopecia. Her bald head might cause her to stand out on campus, but she also stands out because of her upbeat personality and positive attitude.

Payton has spoken with young girls living with the condition, to inspire and empower them that it’s nothing to be ashamed about. She credits her family and faith in helping her stay confident in who she is. Watch her heartening interview here.

My struggle with autoimmunity: Part 1 (Discovery)

In 2012, life was pretty much perfect. I was 19 years old, and I had just gotten back from a semester abroad in Spain, where I had spent little time studying, and a lot of time travelling, meeting new people, and practicing foreign languages. Little did I know what was in store for me for the next year of my life.

Upon my return to North America, I started to experience a myriad of strange symptoms that would baffle both me and my doctors for many months to come.

I first began to experience eye dryness. It wasn’t that bad at first- just an eye drop here, an eye drop there. But when I would wake up, my eyelids would be glued to my eyeballs, to the point where I would have to peel my lids off of my eyes, which would be red and bloody from the pain. I spoke with my optometrist about the dryness, believing that laser eye surgery from the year before was to blame.

The strange thing was, as time passed, I began to realize that the dryness extended beyond my eyes- I now was experiencing severe dryness in my mouth as well, and blaming my laser eye surgery no longer made sense. In fact, when I made a trip to the dental hygienist later that year, she scolded me profusely, and pronounced that I had eight (!) cavities. Having never had a cavity in my entire life, this came as quite the surprise.

I found out soon afterwards that not only did I have cavities, but I had developed a nasty case of oral thrush as well. This meant that I now had a yeast infection in my mouth! Horrified, I was sent home with a huge bottle of antibiotic mouthwash, a mouth full of fillings, and a significantly reduced bank balance.

At this point, I was already suffering from a lack of sleep, having to wake up multiple times a night to put in eye drops, and to drink gallons of water to ease my dehydration. But my next symptom would be the “tipping point” for me. I began to experience joint pain in my fingers and toes that was so severe, I could’ve sworn that cutting off my little appendages would have been less painful.

After 72 hours straight of no sleep (due to the pain), I dragged my miserable ass to a family doctor to discuss my health issues. I expected to walk right out of the office with a diagnosis, treatment and prescription for a cure. I did not realize it at the time, but I had just embarked on a very, very long journey.

Read Part 2 of my story here.