iMD Partners with the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA); Is There a Connection Between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and Autoimmune Disease?

iMD Partners with the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA)

On July 17, 2019, iMD Health Global, a Toronto-based health technology company, announced that it has formed a strategic partnership with the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA). The partnership will help enhance communication between physicians and autoimmune disease patients to improve health outcomes.

iMD Health provides revolutionary technology to facilitate dialogue between physicians and patients inside the examination room. The iMD platform enables healthcare professionals to instantly access thousands of educational graphics, videos and resources at the point of care. The company’s platform is currently being used across Canada, and is now expanding across the United States as well.

Virginia Ladd, Executive Director & President of the AARDA commented, “With iMD, quick and easy access to a robust and visually appealing resource is now literally at the physician’s fingertips. With a better understanding of their conditions, patients can make informed and responsible decisions about managing their health and the required steps to address their condition.”

To read more about this exciting new partnership, click here.

Is There a Connection Between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and Autoimmune Disease?

Dawn Debois, a columnist on Lambert-Eaton News, explores the relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and the development of autoimmune disease.

Debois has several autoimmune conditions herself, including Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS), psoriatic arthritis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and ankylosing spondylitis. These conditions lead to her being diagnosed with multiple autoimmune syndrome.

Debois believes that the early childhood trauma that she experienced from losing her mother before the age of five and being placed into foster care may have triggered the onset of these autoimmune conditions. She completed a questionnaire that revealed that she had an ACE score of four, which is considered high, and is a high predictor of diagnosed autoimmune disease in adulthood, according to this study.

She further discusses the prevalence of the protein HLA-B27 in her blood, which can lead to a higher risk of developing certain autoimmune diseases. Therefore, while early childhood trauma may be an environmental factor affecting the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, there are genetic factors as well.

To read more about Deb’s story and the link between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and autoimmunity, click here.

Actress Jameela Jamil Describes Life with Autoimmune Disease

British actress and model Jameela Jamil struggles with daily living with two chronic illnesses, including an autoimmune disease.

British actress and model Jameela Jamil took to Instagram this week to describe her struggle of living with an autoimmune disease. The 33-year-old suffers from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, an autoimmune disease in which one’s immune system attacks the thyroid gland, causing hypothryoidism (an underactive thyroid). This, in turn, can lead to symptoms such as weight gain, fatigue and depression.

Jamil wrote, “Living with an autoimmune condition is a real pain in the arse, and it irrationally makes you feel like a failure for not being able to “live it up” like other “normal” people. Shout out to all of us who struggle with this, and go through all of the incredible shitty days, and make it through each one. Even if it’s just by the skin of our teeth. We are LEGENDS for our strength of character.”

In addition to Hashimoto’s, Jamil also revealed that she has Ehler’s-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type 3. While this chronic illness is not autoimmune, in causes various painful symptoms, such as joint hypermobility, loose joints, poor wound healing and easy bruising. Like Hashimoto’s, there is no cure for EDS. Jamil confirmed her condition after a fan asked her why her arm was overextended in a photo on Twitter, then subsequently posted a video stretching her skin.

Jamil also described how hard it is to take care of herself, while others around her experience few health problems, even if they don’t care for their health. She wrote on her Instagram page, “Shout out if you are so fucking tired of having to protect yourself in a bubble while so many other people are able to just eat what they want, take drugs, stay out all night, drink a lot, take risks, do sports….etc. But you make one less than perfect choice and your day/week is ruined. The envy is real…I see you. I hear you. I feel you. I’m with you.”

To read more about Jameela Jamil and her fight against Hashimoto’s and EDS, click here.

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How a 71-year-old man got diagnosed with Autoimmune Encephalitis (AE)

Robert Given was a 71-year-old Accountant who ran his own CPA firm and was heavily involved in his local community. Although he didn’t have any prior history of autoimmune disease, he suddenly found himself impacted by a severe autoimmune condition.

While dining out with friends, Given suddenly slumped over, had a seizure, and urinated on himself. Restaurant patrons helped him to lay on the floor and called an ambulance. By the time the ambulance arrived, he had regained consciousness but was confused, refusing to step into the ambulance until his wife told him to.

After being evaluated by a number of physicians, including an internist and a neurologist, the medical professionals made several interesting discoveries. Given had had a sudden drop in blood pressure that was uncharacteristic for someone with well-controlled high blood pressure like himself. His wife also reported that he was losing his balance, had difficulty sleeping and sometimes had slurred speech. He was also highly talkative, to the point that it appeared to be logorrhea – a constant need to talk, even if the speech is often incoherent and repetitive.

Given had a second seizure, and was once again transported to the hospital. After this second episode, his doctor pondered what condition could possibly cause a sudden onset of both neurological and psychiatric symptoms. He hypothesized that his patient might have either Multiple Sclerosis (MS), or some type of heavy metal toxicity and ordered a round of tests to see if this was the case.

The tests came back negative for MS and heavy metals, and his medical team thought that they had to go back to the drawing board. Suddenly, however, his internist Dr. Hersch realized that he had seen a similar case several years prior; the patient had died, but his test results had revealed that he had autoimmune encephalitis (AE), a group of conditions in which the immune system mistakenly attacks the brain.

Dr. Hersch ordered a new round a tests that confirmed that Robert Given did indeed have a type of autoimmune encephalitis caused by a rogue antibody called CASPR2. Symptoms included fluctuations in blood pressure and heart rate, loss of balance, insomnia, and personality changes, and the majority of patients were men over the age of 65- just like Given!

Given has been receiving treatment for his condition at the Mayo Clinic for the last three years. Due to the difficult nature of this disease, his recovery is slow, but he is relieved to have been diagnosed in time to receive life-saving medication.

The Autoimmune Encephalitis Alliance says that while Given is lucky to have received a diagnosis, their aim is to raise awareness so that others with AE do not have to rely on luck to determine the outcome of the disease.

To read the original story by Dr. Lisa Sanders from the New York Times, click here. Also, check out this trailer for Brain on Fire, a movie based on a real-life story of a woman with AE.