Christina Anstead Reveals Her Struggle with Autoimmune Disease

Christina Anstead, 36, Reveals Struggle with Autoimmune Diseases

Reality TV star Christina Anstead from the hit HDTV show Christina on the Coast revealed she suffers from autoimmune diseases this past week.

In a candid Instagram video featuring her 4-month-old son Hudson, Anstead wrote, “With having autoimmune issues and a new baby, I need all the help I can get. Supplements are key for me to feeling my best. I take a ton of supplements and [NatureWise] is my go-to brand.” 

In the comments, a fan asked for details on which autoimmune issues she had. Anstead replied that she suffers from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS). She also said she has Eczema, which flares up when she consumes certain foods.

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis is an autoimmune condition in which the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks the thyroid gland. This, in turn, leads to hypothyroidism, in which the thyroid gland underproduces important hormones necessary for metabolism and other bodily functions. Common symptoms include fatigue, weight gain, constipation, heavy menstrual periods and feeling cold all the time.

PCOS is a condition that involves the recurrence of cysts on a woman’s ovaries. While PCOS is not yet proven to be autoimmune, a 2016 publication theorized that it is an autoimmune disease; the theory states that the condition starts when low levels of progesterone cause the body to over-produce estrogen, which results in the production of auto-antibodies.

Eczema is an inflammatory skin condition that results in painful, itchy rashes and redness of the skin. It is often triggered by external factors, such as certain foods, smoke, pollen, or other irritants.

Having experienced both painful ovarian cysts and irritating eczema myself, I can relate to Anstead’s struggle a lot. However, with the right treatment and proactive care, the symptoms can be manageable. And, the fact that Anstead has accomplished so much as a successful real estate investor, reality TV star, and mom of five, while managing multiple chronic illnesses, makes her success all the more impressive.

Practicing Gratitude When You Have a Chronic Illness

Gratitude doesn’t change what we have in front of us; it changes the way we see what we have

Anonymous

This past Thursday was Thanksgiving here in the United States. I spent the day with my husband’s family and I couldn’t be more grateful to have them close by when I’m far away from my own family.

This got me thinking about practicing gratitude in general. How often do we really give thanks for what we have? Only once a year, when Thanksgiving rolls around? Or are we only thankful for what we have when we’ve lost it (in other words, when it’s too late)?

When you have an autoimmune disease or any other type of chronic illness, it can be challenging to feel grateful for what you have. I mean, how could I feel thankful for having near-constant joint pain, fatigue, widespread dryness, skin issues and brain fog, among other symptoms of Sjogren’s Syndrome and Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS)?

But, if I challenge myself to think harder, I can actually think of many ways in which I should be grateful for what I have. Many people, especially those who are less fortunate or who live in developing countries, don’t have access to a reliable healthcare system, including adequate treatment options, necessary medications, and educated health care professionals. Even here in the United States, many people with chronic illness struggle to afford their medications, health insurance or co-pays for doctor’s visits. While I am by no means rich, I’m thankful that I have the ability to take care of my healthcare needs when many people cannot.

Another thing that I’m grateful for is the amazing chronic illness community that I’ve connected with in the past two years of blogging on this site. Having a chronic illness can sometimes be lonely, and you may feel like no one understands what you’re going through (especially if none of your family or friends have a disease themselves, or if you don’t have a satisfactory support system). However, by connecting with others on WordPress, Instagram and Reddit who are in a similar situation, I’ve quickly realized that I’m far from being alone, and I’ve learned new methods of self-care that have helped me manage my illness.

Thanks for reading this blog post! If you’re an Autoimmune Warrior, what are you thankful for (that you may have forgotten to be grateful about)? Comment below and let me know!

Related Blog Posts:

Girl with Autoimmune Disease Creates Teddy Bears that Hide IV Bags; British Columbia Mother Sues Over Breast Implant Risks; Woman Describes her Experience with Multiple Autoimmune Diseases

Girl with Autoimmune Disease Creates Teddy Bears that Hide IV Bags

Medi-Teddies are designed to hide IV bags for children receive intravenous treatments

Ella Casano was diagnosed with an autoimmune condition called Idiopathic Thrombocytopenia Purpura (ITP) when she was just 7 years old. ITP is known to cause low platelet levels, excessive bruising and bleeding.

Now 12 years old, Ella receives IV infusions every 8 weeks to ease the symptoms of her condition. As part of a class project, she had to come up with a business idea, and, thinking about her experience with IV infusions and how scary the medical equipment can look to children, she came up with the idea of the “Medi-Teddy”, a teddy bear that hides IV bags.

Ella’s family started a GoFundMe page to raise $5,000 to provide 500 Medi-Teddies to kids in need. For more on this story and to learn how you can donate, click here.

British Columbia Mother Sues Over Breast Implant Risks

Samara Bunsko is involved in a class action lawsuit alleging her breast implants made her sick.

Samara Bunsko, 28, of Maple Ridge, British Columbia, Canada, is suing breast implant manufacturer Allergan over allegations that her implants caused her to develop various health issues, including hair loss, irregular thyroid and iron levels, headaches, fatigue and cysts.

Samara is the lead plaintiff in two proposed class action lawsuits against breast implant manufacturers, alleging that they did not disclose the risk of developing certain cancers or autoimmune diseases as a result of the implants.

Dr. Jan Tervaert, Director of Rheumatology at the University of Alberta’s School of Medicine, says that research shows that patients with a genetic predisposition for autoimmune disease have the highest risk of developing symptoms. Furthermore, patients who have had implants the longest are the least likely to experience a cessation in their symptoms once the implants are removed.

Health Canada is conducting a safety review of systemic symptoms caused by breast implants, including the development of autoimmune conditions. To learn more, click here.

Amy Hoey has five different autoimmune diseases, none of which have a cure.

Woman Describes her Experience with Multiple Autoimmune Diseases

Amy Hoey was a young teen when she began to experience a myriad of symptoms, including severely dry skin and body aches. She was told by professionals that she was likely just experiencing eczema and growing pains, when in fact, she had an autoimmune condition called psoriasis. Psoriasis can affect the joints and develop into psoriatic arthritis, which is what happened to Amy.

Later, Amy began to experience extreme fatigue, hair loss, kidney infections and chest pain. She went on to receive a diagnosis of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, an autoimmune condition in which the immune system attacks the thyroid gland.

She started to experience even more symptoms, including a butterfly-shaped rash on her face, mouth ulcers, and memory loss, which lead to the diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Lupus causes damage to the body’s internal organs, skin and joints.

To top it off, Amy also has celiac disease, an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system damages the small intestine in response to consuming gluten, the protein found in wheat.

Amy felt like she constantly had the flu. Worse still, the physicians she worked with seemed to know little about autoimmune conditions, and one even Googled her conditions in front of her! She also has had allergic reactions to medications used to treat autoimmune disease, and also has a genetic condition that makes her more susceptible to infections, which can be a challenge, since many autoimmune treatments work by suppressing the immune system.

Amy says her best advice is to focus on what you can do, not what you can’t do. While she had a difficult time accepting this at first, since she used to be an athlete, maintaining a positive attitude and working with a knowledgeable rheumatologist have been helpful for her treatment.

To read more about Amy’s story, click here.