Teen with Autoimmune Disease Backing Bill to Allow Medical Marijuana in Schools

A teenage boy looks at Bill 331 and smiles alongside a government leader
Connor Scheffield, an autoimmune disease patient, is supporting a bill that would allow medical marijuana in Maryland schools

Connor Scheffield, a teen from Annapolis, Maryland, is backing a bill that would allow medical marijuana to be taken at a nurse’s office in Maryland schools. Currently, medical marijuana is banned from school campuses across the state.

Connor says that if it weren’t for medical marijuana, he wouldn’t be able to get through the school day. This is because the teen suffers from a rare autoimmune disease called Gastro-Intestinal Dysmotility.

GI Dysmotility is a painful condition that causes patients to not be able to digest food and nutrients properly and process waste. Dysmotility refers to the abnormal movement of food, nutrients and waste through the GI tract. When the body’s immune system attacks the nerves in the GI tract, transit through the GI tract becomes impaired. Symptoms of the condition include nausea, bloating, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pains, early satiety, and involuntary weight loss. Neurological symptoms may also accompany the disease.

According to Lawrence Szarka, MD, from the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, GI Dysmotility can be disabling. “Patients who have [GI Dysmotility] are miserable,” commented Dr. Szarka. “They have no appetite. They have terrible abdominal pains and constipation. Often these patients undergo lots of diagnostic testing and multiple consultations.”

Like many autoimmune diseases, because GI Dysmotility involves the immune system, nervous system, and digestive system, patients must consult with a team of physicians spanning multiple specialty areas. Furthermore, treatment options are extremely limited, and tend to focus on treating the symptoms, like facilitating gastric emptying, rather than treating the disease itself. And while immunotherapies do exist, some patients who test positive for antibodies don’t always respond to the medication.

Young boy is hospitalized for GI Dysmotility, a disabling autoimmune disease
Connor receives treatment for GI Dysmotility, a rare autoimmune disease

Connor was one of those patients. His father, Michael Scheffield, says that his son tried everything before turning to medical marijuana to find solace, and that it’s the only treatment that’s worked so far. Connor takes it in the form of an oil tincture; he puts just a few drops on his tongue and takes it with a swig a water. “I need it every few hours,” said Connor. “It’s the difference between life and death.”

A young boy in the hospital hooked up to fluids as he undergoes treatment for GI Dysmotility
Connor Scheffield was confined to hospital beds as a child before finding solace in medical marijuana

Prior to using medical marijuana, Connor was confined to hospital beds. Since it’s currently illegal to use the substance at schools in Maryland, he must leave his school every few hours in order to take a dose. It’s also illegal for underage individuals to take medical marijuana without the presence of an adult, so when his parents are out of town, Connor has to go without. On those days, the teen says he can hardly get through a school day. “You can take opioids, you know, painkillers in a nurse’s office,” commented Connor. “But I can’t take my cannabis.”

House Bill 331, dubbed ‘Connor’s Courage’ would allow medical marijuana to be used in a nurse’s office in Maryland schools. Connor is currently one of 200 children who are certified to use medical marijuana in Maryland, and who could stand to benefit from this bill.

To learn more about Connor’s story and his experience with GI Dysmotility, please visit the CBS Baltimore website.