Carrie Ann Inaba Takes Leave of Absence Due to Autoimmune Diseases

Carrie Ann Inaba has said that she is taking a leave of absence from her TV hosting role to focus on her health.

Carrie Ann Inaba, TV host on CBS’ The Talk and judge on ABC’s hit show Dancing with the Stars opened up about her struggle living with autoimmune diseases and chronic illnesses on her blog, Carrie Ann Conversations.

The Emmy award-nominated TV personality said that she has been diagnosed with several different autoimmune diseases and chronic conditions over the years, including Sjogren’s Syndrome, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) and Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), and she also has the markers for Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS), which causes blood clots. The 53-year-old dancer and choreographer says she also struggles with fibromyalgia and spinal stenosis.

As a result of her various autoimmune conditions, Inaba has taken a leave of absence from her role on The Talk so that she can focus on her health, reports MedPage Today.

Talking about her health journey, Inaba said: “Even if we are fortunate enough to get a diagnosis, we can quickly end up with more questions than answers. Often when it comes to autoimmune conditions there is no perfect solution or clear path forward.”

Inaba continued, explaining: “Coping with autoimmune conditions can sometimes feel quite lonely. When I first got diagnosed, some encouraged me to keep my struggles to myself, but I’ve found that it’s always been better to be honest about my needs and realities than to stay silent. I believe strongly in sharing my journey, my solutions, and the things that have helped me.”

In this spirit, Inaba has shared on her blog the products that have helped her cope with her autoimmune disease symptoms – including eye dryness, mouth dryness, joint pain, fatigue, brain fog and more – so that others can benefit from these products and see if they work for them.

This isn’t the first time that Carrie Ann Inaba has opened up about her health struggles. The starlet previously posted on Instagram about how she felt ashamed of her autoimmune diseases, and wanting “…to be what people see. And people see a healthy person, from the outside.” However, confronting her health problems made Inaba reflect on who she is as a person, besides just her identity as a “sexy dancer chick.”

From all of us at Autoimmune Warrior, we want to thank Carrie Ann for opening up about her health journey as an #AutoimmuneWarrior, and raising awareness about the 80+ autoimmune diseases affecting over 23 million Americans. Because of celebrities like her, more people among the general population are learning about autoimmune conditions, and why extensive research is needed to find better treatments, and eventually, a cure.

Toni Braxton Opens Up About Battle with Lupus

Award-winning singer Toni Braxton, 53, has struggled with the autoimmune condition lupus for over a decade.
Award-winning singer Toni Braxton, 53, has struggled with the autoimmune condition lupus for over a decade. (Photo courtesy of Rich Fury/Getty Images)

Legendary singer and songwriter Toni Braxton sat down with publication The Grio to detail her ongoing battle with systemic lupus erythematosus, known as lupus for short. The seven-time Grammy award winner was diagnosed with the autoimmune disease in 2008, after she suffered a heart attack on stage during a live performance in Las Vegas.

“The doctors told me I could never perform again. I have systemic lupus. My lupus loves my heart. It loves my microvascular system. It loves my blood, so I get blood clots,” she explained. “The chronic pain and fatigue associated with it were overwhelming for me initially.”

The autoimmune condition affects more than 5 million people worldwide, including 1.5 million Americans. Lupus is known to affect the body’s major organs, including the heart, lungs, skin and more. Beyond the physical symptoms, however, Braxton said the disease took a toll on her mental health too.

“When I was first diagnosed, I felt that I had no one to help me,” she said. Braxton continued, “I always tried to be vocal and educate people. I remember being afraid and I don’t want anyone to feel that feeling I had.”

Though the condition initially caused her to pause her career, Braxton found relief with CBD, the compound found in medical marijuana, with helping to manage her chronic pain.

“I found that Uncle Bud’s doesn’t have THC, the stuff that makes you high. More importantly, with my body being inflamed and so on, it offers anti-inflammatory properties and for me, I need that.” She continued, “It can change your life because sometimes you just need hope. I’m so glad they finally made it legal. It’s a great thing because of the healing properties for people like myself.”

As for her advice on how to cope with having lupus, Braxton commented: “It’s not your fault. It’s nothing you did. It’s just what it is. It’s just what your body is or has become. There’s nothing you could have done to change it.”

Since her lupus symptoms have improved, she has returned to singing and has released a new album, Spell My Name in August 2020. She’s also been busy filming the reality TV series, Braxton Family Values.


    

Rare Autoimmune Disease Claims Australian Woman’s Life

Chris Ferguson (left) pictured with his wife Marcia Ferguson-Roa of Australia, were avid travelers prior to her devastating autoimmune diagnosis. Photo courtesy of the Sydney Morning Herald.

Australian couple Marcia Ferguson-Roa and her husband, Kris Ferguson, enjoyed spending their time sailing in their dream yacht. But in October of 2020, Marcia began to experience a myriad of strange symptoms that wouldn’t go away, and that kept her from her beloved pastime of sailing.

She experienced more fatigue than usual, and had a persistent dry cough. She also had ulcerating marks appear on her forehead and other parts of her body. Doctors weren’t able to determine what was wrong, until Marcia ended up in the hospital a month later.

That’s when she was diagnosed with a rare autoimmune disease called dermatomyositis (DM). Dermatomyositis is rare, affecting just nine in 1 million people worldwide. The specific type of dermatomyositis that Marcia had, however, was even less common; named MDA5 antibody positive dermatomyositis, it is more life-threatening than other forms of DM, since it affects the lungs. Only 5% of those with DM have this particular variation, making it extremely challenging to diagnose.

Myositis is a group of autoimmune disorders that cause muscle inflammation, and dermatomyositis also affects the skin. The Myositis Association Australia states that 1 in 200,000 people have some form of myositis. Unfortunately, some of the symptoms, such as muscle weakness and fatigue, are often overlooked as just the normal signs of aging, Christine Lowe, the Association’s President said.

Unfortunately, though Marcia fought hard against her disease, her condition worsened and doctors were forced to put her in a medically-induced coma. She never woke up, and one week later, she was pronounced dead. Her husband Kris was devastated to learn of her passing after almost 40 years of marriage.

“I told her I loved her and that we would talk tomorrow,” he said. “There was no tomorrow.”

Dr. Girgis, the head of rheumatology at St. Vincent’s hospital where Marcia was hospitalized, said more research dedicated to autoimmune diseases is necessary to find the root cause of why the body attacks its own tissues.

Interestingly enough, another man named Abu Jalil was treated for the same rare variation of dermatomyositis that Marcia had at the same hospital in Australia. When the local paper published a story about Abu’s plight, the community raised over $180,000 for his expensive treatment and medications, which aren’t covered by the country’s National Benefits Scheme. Thankfully, Abu’s condition is improving.

To learn more about Marcia’s battle with dermatomyositis, read the full article in the Sydney Morning Herald.

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