10-Year-Old Battling Autoimmune Disease Becomes Special Deputy

Caleb Anderson, Special Deputy for Boone County, is battling an autoimmune disease

Caleb Anderson, a 10-year-old boy from the Indianapolis, Indiana area, has become the newest member of the Boone County Sheriff’s Office.

Caleb, who is battling an autoimmune disease, wants to be a K-9 handler when he grows up. As such, the Boone County Sheriff’s Office wanted to surprise Caleb by swearing him in and deputizing him as a Special Deputy. At the swearing in ceremony, Caleb got to meet K-9 Deputies Clint Stewart and Taylor Nielsen, along with their trusted K-9 partners, Makya and Arco. Nelson Uniforms also donated a full uniform and tactical boots for Caleb to wear.

Caleb Anderson meets K-9 handlers and their K-9 partners at the Boone County Sheriff’s Office

Sheriff Nielsen commented, “Caleb’s theme is ‘Fight Courageously’, we can all learn from this.” He continued, “We have learned from Caleb that when we are faced with difficulties in life that we fight with everything we have. Keep fighting Deputy Caleb, we will always be in your corner.”

Sue Anderson, Caleb’s mother, said that Caleb currently attends Connections Academy, an online school. She explained, “Since Caleb is immune suppressed he can’t go into a classroom setting due to the risk of infection for him.”

Anderson explained that she was connected with the Sheriff’s Department when Caleb had the opportunity to meet up with Deputy Nielsen to do K9 training, and from there, was introduced to all of the amazing people at the Boone County Sheriff’s Office. “Caleb dreams about being a K9 handler one day and is a little shadow to the Sheriff and Deputy Nielsen,” she said.

The Autoimmune Warrior team is so happy to see that Caleb is realizing his dreams of becoming a K9 handler! Battling an autoimmune disease is never easy, and especially challenging as a child. Thank you, Caleb, for being an inspiration to us all.

To watch Caleb’s swearing in ceremony, check out the video on Boone County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page.

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Video: Living with Autoimmune Diseases

Below is a video from the YouTube channel Our Grandfather Story (OGS), which raises awareness about overlooked stories across Southeast Asia. In this video, OGS interviews people with autoimmune diseases to ask them questions like, “Are you really sick?” “Can you be cured?” and “Should I pity you?” I found the video to be very relatable, especially as someone with an invisible illness, and I liked how they talked about some of the mental health impacts of chronic illness as well.

The participants in the video live with the following conditions: myasthenia gravis (MG), primary sclerosing cholangitis, autoimmune hepatitis, ulcerative colitis, autoimmune encephalitis, and lupus nephritis.

Thank you to OGS for raising awareness about autoimmune diseases; I hope my readers enjoy the video as much as I did!

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American Family to Immigrate to Canada After Type 1 Diabetes Diagnosis

The Reseburgs have applied to immigrate to Canada as a result of their daughter’s medical diagnosis. Photo courtesy of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC).

Amanda Reseburg and her husband of Janesville, Wisconsin, have applied to immigrate to Nova Scotia, a province in Atlantic Canada. While Reseburg has always admired the region’s coastal views, the beautiful scenery is not the reason for her family’s desire to move.

Reseburg’s nine-year-old daughter, Molly, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune condition in which the body’s own immune system destroys insulin-producing cells, called islets, in the pancreas. Consequently, the body produces little to no insulin, an important hormone that enables glucose to enter cells and produce energy. Symptoms of the condition can include fatigue and weakness, blurred vision, unintended weight loss, extreme hunger, increased thirst and frequent urination, among other complications.

The family is hoping that by moving to the Canadian province, they will receive better insurance coverage and more affordable insulin. Reseburg says her daughter takes six to 10 needles a day of long-acting and short-acting insulin. She is also using a continuous glucose monitoring system, which monitors her blood sugar levels and must be replaced every 10 days.

Reseburg says they have been fortunate thus far- their family has medical coverage through her husband’s employment. However, given the current state of the economy and how closely medical insurance is tied to employment in the United States, she wonders what would happen if he were to lose his job.

Nine-year-old Molly Reseburg was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease impacting her insulin levels. Photo courtesy of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC).

Another consideration is that once their daughter becomes an adult, she may no longer be eligible to be on their insurance coverage. Reseburg said, “I don’t want to tell my kids, ‘Go find a good office job.’ I want them to be able to do what they want to do, and not have to worry about insurance.”

The affordability of insulin is another concern. While she has never had to go across the border to buy insulin, she understands why people do it. “I don’t see America getting on board [affordable insulin] any time soon, so that’s why we’re looking to move,” she explained.

Reseburg has also been frustrated with the lack of consumer choice with her daughter’s medication. Several months ago, her insurance company informed her that they would no longer be covering the insulin her daughter currently takes, and would be switching her to a new type of insulin instead. “We don’t get any say in that whatsoever. They decide what insulin they will allow us to have,” she lamented.

This is particularly concerning due to the fact that her daughter Molly also suffers from a chromosomal condition called Turner syndrome, which impacts the effectiveness of the insulin she takes. And, not only was the type of insulin changed, but the insurance company is covering $75 less, resulting in the family having to pay even more out of pocket for this necessary treatment.

The family has retained an immigration lawyer to help them with their Canadian immigration application. On top of attorney fees, the immigration fees cost several thousand dollars, plus extensive paperwork detailing how the family will be able to adapt to their new country and how they plan to contribute to the economy. The mountain of paperwork is worth it, however, since the family says that if their application is successful, their daughter’s insulin will be covered and she’ll no longer be at the mercy of their insurance company.

While it usually takes about two years to immigrate to Canada, the COVID-19 situation could draw out the process even longer. Nevertheless, the family is hopeful that their plan will pan out. “We’ll get their eventually,” Reseburg said.

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