8-Year-Old Who Died from Autoimmune Diseases Leaves Legacy 'List of Rules'

Ellie Pruitt was an 8-year-old girl who left a legacy of wisdom after passing from autoimmune diseases

Ellie Pruitt was an 8-year-old girl from Canton, Georgia, who passed away from various autoimmune diseases.

When Ellie was just three years old, she began to complain of pains in her legs and fatigue. Ellie’s parents took her to a Pediatric Rheumatologist who confirmed that she had juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, an autoimmune condition causing painful inflammation in the joints. She took steroids and received injections of methotrexate, a disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug designed to reduce the inflammation.

During Ellie’s short lifetime, she participated in medical studies to determine what causes autoimmune disease. Both of her parents, Heather and Chuck Pruitt, have autoimmune conditions themselves; Heather was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was a college senior, and Chuck was diagnosed with lupus at age 15.

In addition to the medical studies, Ellie and her family participated in the Walk to Cure Arthritis. They formed a team of families representing four children with the condition, called the Woodstock Warriors Against Juvenile Arthritis. Their team raised more than $5,000 for the cause.

Ellie participated in the Walk to Cure Arthritis with her family

After Ellie passed away on February 6th, her parents found a list of ‘rules to live by‘ that she had written. The rules were: 1) Have fun 2) No fighting 3) No pushing, shoving or hitting, and 4) Always love. After her parents found the list of rules, they decided to share it with her classmates to help comfort them after her passing.

Ellie Pruitt’s list of rules to live by

“It’s amazing that an 8-year-old little girl knew what we should focus on,” her mother Heather Pruitt said. “She started [rule] number 5, but erased it, because she knew that’s the greatest…If you can do all those things, you’re going to be in good shape.”

As a tribute to young Ellie’s wisdom, her hometown decided to display her list of rules in various places around their community. Local businesses like Bruster’s and Chick-fil-A displayed rules 1 and 4 on signage outside their stores.

Chick-fil-A displays a sign with two of Ellie’s rules on it

According to Ellie’s obituary, she was very artistic and loved to do crafts, draw, and paint. She was also a dancer and a musician (she played the piano). Her favorite places were school, church and the beach.

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Mattel Releases Diverse Barbie Collection, Featuring Dolls with Autoimmune Diseases and Disabilities

The New Line Features Dolls with Vitiligo, No Hair and Prosthetic Limb

Toymaker Mattel is drawing headlines with its latest Barbie collection, featuring a new line up of dolls with autoimmune diseases and disabilities, as well as a more diverse depiction of beauty.

The lineup includes a doll with vitiligo, an autoimmune condition in which the body attacks and destroys the cells that produce melanin, a pigment that give the skin color. This results in white patches or irregular shapes on the skin that can grow and spread.

Stella Pavlides, President and Chief Executive of the American Vitiligo Research Foundation in Clearwater, Florida, applauds the move by Mattel to showcase dolls with the condition. She says that children living with vitiligo could benefit from a doll that looks like them, especially when it comes to dealing with the social stigma of the disease. Pavlides, who has vitiligo herself, recalls that the social stigma of growing up with the condition was so severe, that store clerks would refuse to take money from her hand.

The lineup of Barbie dolls also features another model with no hair, which could be appealing to young girls who suffer from alopecia, an autoimmune disease in which the body attacks and destroys hair follicles. Conversely, the line also includes a male Ken doll with long, luscious locks, rather than the traditional preppy crew cut.

The South China Morning Post reports that the move by Mattel represents a broader move by society to be more accepting of diverse representations of beauty. For example, Canadian model Winnie Harlow is famous for becoming the first supermodel with vitiligo, and Congresswoman Ayanna Pressley recently revealed her battle with alopecia.

Mattel’s new collection of barbies also includes a doll with a golden prosthetic limb, demonstrating that beauty comes in all forms, and includes those with disabilities, too. In 2019, the company had released a doll in a wheelchair as well.

Mattel reports that over half of their dolls sold by the company came from a diverse set of backgrounds. In fact, a spokesperson for the company stated that their top selling doll was an African-American Barbie with an Afro.

What do you think of Mattel’s move to showcase more diversity in their dolls, particularly those showing chronic illnesses and disabilities? Leave your thoughts in the comments below!

Teen with Autoimmune Disease Backing Bill to Allow Medical Marijuana in Schools

A teenage boy looks at Bill 331 and smiles alongside a government leader
Connor Scheffield, an autoimmune disease patient, is supporting a bill that would allow medical marijuana in Maryland schools

Connor Scheffield, a teen from Annapolis, Maryland, is backing a bill that would allow medical marijuana to be taken at a nurse’s office in Maryland schools. Currently, medical marijuana is banned from school campuses across the state.

Connor says that if it weren’t for medical marijuana, he wouldn’t be able to get through the school day. This is because the teen suffers from a rare autoimmune disease called Gastro-Intestinal Dysmotility.

GI Dysmotility is a painful condition that causes patients to not be able to digest food and nutrients properly and process waste. Dysmotility refers to the abnormal movement of food, nutrients and waste through the GI tract. When the body’s immune system attacks the nerves in the GI tract, transit through the GI tract becomes impaired. Symptoms of the condition include nausea, bloating, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pains, early satiety, and involuntary weight loss. Neurological symptoms may also accompany the disease.

According to Lawrence Szarka, MD, from the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, GI Dysmotility can be disabling. “Patients who have [GI Dysmotility] are miserable,” commented Dr. Szarka. “They have no appetite. They have terrible abdominal pains and constipation. Often these patients undergo lots of diagnostic testing and multiple consultations.”

Like many autoimmune diseases, because GI Dysmotility involves the immune system, nervous system, and digestive system, patients must consult with a team of physicians spanning multiple specialty areas. Furthermore, treatment options are extremely limited, and tend to focus on treating the symptoms, like facilitating gastric emptying, rather than treating the disease itself. And while immunotherapies do exist, some patients who test positive for antibodies don’t always respond to the medication.

Young boy is hospitalized for GI Dysmotility, a disabling autoimmune disease
Connor receives treatment for GI Dysmotility, a rare autoimmune disease

Connor was one of those patients. His father, Michael Scheffield, says that his son tried everything before turning to medical marijuana to find solace, and that it’s the only treatment that’s worked so far. Connor takes it in the form of an oil tincture; he puts just a few drops on his tongue and takes it with a swig a water. “I need it every few hours,” said Connor. “It’s the difference between life and death.”

A young boy in the hospital hooked up to fluids as he undergoes treatment for GI Dysmotility
Connor Scheffield was confined to hospital beds as a child before finding solace in medical marijuana

Prior to using medical marijuana, Connor was confined to hospital beds. Since it’s currently illegal to use the substance at schools in Maryland, he must leave his school every few hours in order to take a dose. It’s also illegal for underage individuals to take medical marijuana without the presence of an adult, so when his parents are out of town, Connor has to go without. On those days, the teen says he can hardly get through a school day. “You can take opioids, you know, painkillers in a nurse’s office,” commented Connor. “But I can’t take my cannabis.”

House Bill 331, dubbed ‘Connor’s Courage’ would allow medical marijuana to be used in a nurse’s office in Maryland schools. Connor is currently one of 200 children who are certified to use medical marijuana in Maryland, and who could stand to benefit from this bill.

To learn more about Connor’s story and his experience with GI Dysmotility, please visit the CBS Baltimore website.