Top Autoimmune Disease Books to Read in 2020

Have you read any good books lately about autoimmune disease? I am continuously consuming autoimmune-related content, whether it’s blogs, YouTube videos or full-fledged novels. Read on to learn about my favorite autoimmune disease books that you should poke your nose into in 2020!

1. The Autoimmune Epidemic

The Autoimmune Epidemic by journalist Donna Jackson Nakazawa is a thought-provoking read about the potential causes behind many autoimmune conditions. In her book, Jackson Nakazawa theorizes that environmental factors such as pollution, pesticides and other toxins are responsible for the alarming rise in autoimmune diseases over the course of the last few decades. Although not a medical professional or scientist herself, Jackson Nakazawa provides compelling evidence that had me wondering what really triggered my own autoimmune conditions. The author herself has an autoimmune disease called myasthenia gravis that severely affected her mobility. Her book has received praise from numerous acclaimed individuals, including U.S. Senator and Secretary of State John Kerry.

2. An Epidemic of Absence

An Epidemic of Absence by Moises Velasquez-Manoff is another exploratory book about the causes behind autoimmune disease. His main theory is that autoimmune conditions, as well as allergies, are caused by a lack of actual communicable diseases in modern society. In ancient times, our ancestors had to contend with parasites and infectious diseases, like hepatitis A, measles, mumps and tuberculosis, from which they could easily die. However, our modern ‘too-clean’ environment has lead to our immune system attacking a new target – our own bodies – instead. I found that Velasquez-Manoff’s book was a direct contrast to The Autoimmune Epidemic (referenced above), since it posits that autoimmune diseases are caused by an absence of environmental triggers, rather than their presence. The author himself has alopecia universalis, an autoimmune disease that results in total body hair loss.

3. The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principals

The Wahls Protocol by Dr. Terry Wahls is an excellent read. I first heard about Dr. Wahls when I watched her viral TedTalk video, Minding Your Mitochondria, in which she describes the relationship between the body’s gut microbiome and the development of autoimmune disease. In her book, Dr. Wahls, who has multiple sclerosis (MS), details how she went from being wheelchair-bound to competing in a marathon after adopting the principals of her dietary protocol. Before implementing the protocol, her MS continued to worsen, despite receiving excellent treatment from some of the top neurologists in the country. Dr. Wahls also stresses the importance of vitamin D naturally derived from the sun in order to maintain a healthy immune system. Although Dr. Wahls’ advice isn’t 100% proven, her medical background and own track record of success healing herself and others is certainly persuasive.

4. The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook

The Autoimmune Wellness Handbook is the first of several novels penned by Mickey Trescott and co-author Angie Alt. The focus of the book is about the Autoimmune Protocol (AIP), a dietary regimen that involves eating paleo, avoiding gluten and dairy, as well as numerous other foods that could ‘trigger’ an autoimmune reaction. I first read the book when I borrowed it from my local library; I had to wait to read the book though, since it was immensely popular, and I was number 25 on the waiting list! Since then, a family member gifted me with a follow-up book by Trescott, called The Nutrient-Dense Kitchen. The book is chock-full of great recipes that are AIP-friendly. Something I like about Trescott’s books is that they not only provide easy to follow recipes, but actually explain why it is that eating this way can help alleviate autoimmune symptoms for some people, including a deep dive into the science behind leaky gut. Trescott herself has both Celiac disease and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis.

5. The New Sjogren’s Syndrome Handbook

The New Sjogren’s Syndrome Handbook was written by the Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF) and edited by a physician familiar with the disease. What I like about this book is that it’s specific to Sjogren’s Syndrome (SJS), which is an autoimmune condition that I have. The book goes into the fundamentals about SJS, including what the disease is, how it is diagnosed, the main symptoms, complications, and treatment options. The one critique I would have for the book is that although it’s called the ‘New’ Sjogren’s Syndrome Handbook, the book was originally written in the 1990’s, so it’s not really new (though the foundation has come out with revised editions since). Overall, I think it’s a great read for a newly-diagnosed patient with Sjogren’s, or a family member/friend of someone with Sjogren’s, so that they can understand more about the disease.

Those are my top 5 autoimmune disease related books! Do you have any favorite novels related to chronic illness, autoimmune disease, or other health-related topics? If so, please share in the comments below!

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Man left paralyzed from the nose down by rare autoimmune disorder; Man left paralyzed from the nose down by rare autoimmune disorder; MSU student shares her story with Alopecia

Man left paralyzed from the nose down by rare autoimmune disorder

David Braham, a 40-year old man from the United Kingdom, came down with a bad case of food poisoning, which he believes was triggered by eating chicken curry. A few days later, he was in the hospital being put into an induced coma.

It turns out, the food poisoning had caused him to develop a rare autoimmune condition called Guillain-Barre Syndrome. This disorder causes the body’s immune system to attack its own nerves, leaving the patient paralyzed.

Braham is re-learning how to do basic tasks, such as walking, washing himself and brushing his teeth, and is happy that he has been able to return home to his family. Read more about his harrowing story here.

Purdue University developing new treatment options for autoimmune diseases

Purdue University researchers have developed a series of molecules to help provide symptom relief to those with autoimmune conditions.

Mark Cushman, a distinguished professor of medicinal chemistry at the university, was the lead researcher in the study. His research team found that the molecules are more effective than pharmaceuticals currently on the market at affecting cell signaling and inhibiting autoimmune reactions. They have also shown to produce less side effects than conventional treatments.

Read more about this exciting discovery here.

MSU student shares her story with Alopecia

Payton Bland, a freshman student at Minot State University (MSU) in North Dakota, shares her story of acceptance and confidence while living with Alopecia.

Alopecia is an autoimmune condition that causes the body to attack its own hair follicles. The result can be extensive hair loss. In the case of Alopecia Universalis, the patient loses 100% of the hair on their body.

Oftentimes, those affected by this disorder suffer from anxiety. Payton, however, is undeterred by her Alopecia. Her bald head might cause her to stand out on campus, but she also stands out because of her upbeat personality and positive attitude.

Payton has spoken with young girls living with the condition, to inspire and empower them that it’s nothing to be ashamed about. She credits her family and faith in helping her stay confident in who she is. Watch her heartening interview here.