Top News in Autoimmune Disease – May 15, 2019

Type 1 Diabetes Patients Drive to Canada for Affordable Insulin


Lija Greenseid of Minnesota holds up insulin for her 13-year-old daughter that she purchased from Fort Francis, Ontario during an organized caravan ride to Canada. 

Type 1 Diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system attacks and destroys pancreatic cells, rendering them incapable of producing insulin. Insulin is a hormone that the body needs to get glucose from the bloodstream into its cells. As a result, patients with Type 1 Diabetes rely on prescription insulin in order to survive.

Unfortunately, for the majority of Americans, the cost of life-saving insulin keeps going up year after year. As a result, Quinn Nystrom, from Minnesota, organized a caravan to Canada to fill her prescription for insulin, where it sells for a fraction of the cost.

As reported by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), insulin costs significantly less in Canada, thanks to the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board, which sets limits for the maximum price that can be charged for patented drugs. As a result, a vial of insulin that costs $300 in the US is only $30 in Canada, even when it comes from the same brand.

Many patients who cannot afford their medication will ration their insulin. Unfortunately, as a result of not taking the required minimum dose, patients who ‘ration’ their insulin can die.

That’s what happened to Alec Smith-Holt, a 26-year-old man from Minnesota who died in 2017 when he couldn’t afford $1,300 in insulin, and decided to ration his remaining supply. His body was discovered five days later. His mother, Nicole Smith-Holt, joined the caravan to Canada as a symbolic gesture in memory of her son.

To read more about this story, click here.

Executive Gets Purple Mohawk to Benefit Kid with Autoimmune Disease

Cayden Krueger, a young patient with ITP, poses with John Stevenson, who is supporting his Pump it Up for Platelets campaign.

Cayden Krueger, from Madison, Wisconsin, was diagnosed with thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP) when he was just 6 years old. ITP is an autoimmune disease that causes patients to have too few platelets in their blood, resulting in easy bruising and bleeding. Cayden has been raising awareness about ITP by launching a Pump it Up for Platelets fundraiser and sporting a purple mohawk.

When John Stevenson, a Senior Director of Financial Services at US Cellular, heard about Cayden’s story, he challenged his employees to raise money for the Pump it Up for Platelets fundraiser, and pledged to get a purple mohawk himself if they could meet a $1,000 goal. His team ended up raising $2,000, so Stevenson found himself with a new hairdo, and Cayden even got to make the first cut.

To read more about this story, click here.

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Is there a link between diet and autoimmune disease?

About 8 years ago, I saw a powerful TedTalk by Dr. Terry Wahls, called Minding Your Mitochondria.

Dr. Wahls is a physician who was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis, a degenerative autoimmune disease affecting the body’s nervous system. After undergoing traditional therapies for the condition, including chemotherapy and usage of a tilt-recline wheelchair, Dr. Wahls studied biochemistry and learned about the nutrients that played a role in maintaining brain health.

After noticing a slow down in the progression of her disease after taking nutritional supplements, she decided to focus her diet on consuming foods that contained these brain-protecting nutrients. Only a year after beginning her new diet, Dr. Wahls was not only out of her wheelchair, but she had just finished her first 18-mile bike tour! She went on to develop a dietary regimen for those with autoimmune conditions, called the Wahls Protocol.

So, this raises the question, does diet play a role in the development of (and fight against) autoimmune disease?

There is evidence to suggest that there is a link between autoimmunity and one’s diet. For example, I recently wrote about a study published by NYU’s School of Medicine, in which researchers found that the autoimmune disease lupus is strongly linked to imbalances in the gut’s microbiome.

Furthermore, the Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society of Canada also released a report detailing Vitamin D recommendations for MS patients, as a result of studies linking Vitamin D deficiency to the disease. Vitamin D is produced by our skin through sun exposure, but also comes from food sources such as fish, dairy and eggs.

Tara Grant, who has a condition called Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS), an autoimmune condition of the skin, believes that there is a direct link between autoimmunity and diet, as a result of a concept called leaky gut syndrome.

Leaky gut syndrome, also known as intestinal permeability, occurs when the tight junctions between cells in the body’s digestive tract begin to loosen. This enables substances like bacteria, toxins and undigested food particles to enter your bloodstream. Consequently, your immune system reacts to attack these foreign substances, which leads to the development of inflammation and autoimmune disease.

After implementing a restrictive, dairy-free, gluten-free paleo diet, Tara has found that her HS symptoms have completely gone into remission. She now promotes the paleo lifestle on her blog, PrimalGirl, and even released a book, The Hidden Plague, which talks about her struggle treating HS through traditional means, and her journey to healing.

Now I’d like to hear from you Autoimmune Warriors- has changing your diet impacted your chronic health condition in any way? What changes have you implemented that have worked?

Learn More

To read more about the Wahls Protocol, check out Dr. Wahls’ website, and click here to get her book on Amazon.

To read more about Tara Grant’s journey to being HS-free, click here to get her book on Amazon, and check out her amazing gluten-free dough recipe, here.

3 Things Not to Say to Someone with a Chronic Illness

1. “Why don’t you just try exercising more and eating healthier?”

This is one of the most common questions I get asked when I first tell a friend that I have a chronic illness. And while it may be a well-intentioned question, the reality is, autoimmune conditions do not yet have a cure, and eating well and exercising is unlikely to make one’s symptoms dissipate.

While some patients may swear by a certain diet, such as going gluten-free, or adopting a particular exercise regimen, many others do not see a noticeable difference in their symptoms, despite extensive lifestyle changes. Also, such a sentiment often puts an unnecessary burden on the patient, who may feel like they ‘deserve’ their disease for not adopting ‘enough’ of a healthy lifestyle, when in fact, many scientists believe that there is a strong genetic component to autoimmune and other inflammatory conditions, which is beyond the patient’s control.

So please, the next time you think to tell someone to eat more kale to cure their painful rheumatoid arthritis- think again.

2. “Are you sure that’s what you really have? Maybe it’s just depression?”

When someone confides in you that they have a chronic health condition, they want to feel supported. The last thing they want is a friend or family member putting doubt into their mind about their health.

Furthermore, many patients go years from doctor to doctor seeking an answer about their health problems. When they finally get a diagnosis- although shocking and often devastating- there is a certain amount of relief that one experiences in at least knowing ‘what you have’ and the reassurance that what you’re going through is real. Asking someone “if they’re sure” about their condition, is essentially invalidating their health issues, right when that individual has finally found some closure.

Finally, asking if “it’s just depression” is simply unacceptable. Studies have shown that people with autoimmune conditions have a higher incidence of mental health problems such as depression. However, this shouldn’t be brushed off as “just” depression. Moreover, when I personally have been asked this question in the past, it made me think, ‘is this person saying it’s all in my head?’ This, in turn, made me more reticent about sharing health-related news in the future.

3. “It can’t be that bad, can it? You’re just exaggerating!”

For someone else to brush off your disease is the ultimate slap in the face. Many people with chronic health problems have an invisible illness, meaning that on the outside, they may look fine, but on the inside, they are suffering. Symptoms like chronic pain, organ and tissue damage, and fatigue are not usually noticeable to the naked eye.

Even health care professionals often don’t empathize with their patients’ complaints, telling them that they are exaggerating, or accusing them of being a hypochondriac. The result is that the patient may internalize their suffering, and not turn to their physician or loved ones for the medical help and support they need.

Unless you yourself have experienced the relentlessness of having a chronic condition, you can never know what someone with an invisible illness is going through. All you can do is listen and be there for them.

 

Did you like these tips on what NOT to say to someone with a chronic illness? If so, please like, share, and comment below!

Top News in Autoimmunity – Week of Dec. 19, 2018

NMO

Edmonton fighter diagnosed with rare disease

Victor Valimaki, a 37-year old professional fighter from Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, was left crippled by a rare autoimmune disorder.

Although Valimaki has fought in over two dozen professional fights, leading him to a successful career as an Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) mixed-martial arts fighter, he was recently diagnosed with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), otherwise known as Devic’s disease.

This autoimmune condition affects the body’s optic nerves, spinal cord and brain. For Valimaki, the disease caused him to lose his vision, speech, and ability to walk. Although he has since regained his sight, he is still struggling with the other consequences of the disorder.

Read his full story and watch the video on CTV News Edmonton.

Italian biotech company raises 17M€ to fund gene therapies for autoimmune diseases

An Italian biotechnology company named Altheia raised over 17 million euros this week to fund gene therapies that could potentially treat many incurable autoimmune diseases.

The company’s technology, which uses gene therapy to engineer bone marrow stem cells to express a molecule called PD-L1 that inactivates the immune system’s T cells. In other words, the molecule released will ‘hit the breaks’ on the body’s immune system, avoiding an immune system attack on healthy tissue.

Paolo Rizzardi, the company’s CEO, has stated that he expects clinical trials for autoimmune conditions such as multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes to begin in 2021.

Read more about this exciting new development on LABIOTECH.eu.