Top News in Autoimmune Disease – October 8, 2019

Pop Singer Sia Reveals Battle with Autoimmune & Other Chronic Conditions

Pop singer Sia recently revealed in a Tweet that she is battling chronic pain as a result of an autoimmune disease and another genetic condition.

In the Tweet, Sia said, “Hey, I’m suffering with chronic pain, a neurological disease, [and] ehlers danlos and I just wanted to say to those of you suffering from pain, whether physical or emotional, I love you, keep going,” she wrote. “Life is fucking hard. Pain is demoralizing, and you’re not alone.”

Sia suffers from an autoimmune condition called Grave’s disease, which occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the thryoid gland. This results in hyperthyroidism, which is the overproduction of the thyroid hormone. Without treatment, the disease can result in heart problems like irregular heartbeat, blot clots, stroke, and heart failure, as well as eye health issues, like double vision, light sensitivity, eye pain and vision loss. It can even lead to thinning bones and osteoporosis.

In addition to Grave’s, Sia has Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a genetic condition and connective tissue disorder that can affect one’s bones, joints, skin and blood vessels.

Sia’s Tweet has garnered over 170,000 ‘likes’ on Twitter and has many fans responding with well-wishes and sharing their own experiences with chronic illness. One fan tweeted, “We love you so much Sia, you’re not alone either, please take care ❤ sending you lots of love and healing vibes.”

Her Tweet also draws similarities to Jameela Jamil’s Instagram message, in which she also revealed that she has Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and another autoimmune disease called Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, which causes hypothyroidism (the opposite of Grave’s Disease).

To learn more about Grave’s Disease, visit the American Thyroid Association.

Philippines Leader Rodrigo Duterte Says He Has Autoimmune Disease

The President of the Philippines, 74-year-old Rodrigo Duterte, says he suffers from an incurable autoimmune disease. The condition, called myasthenia gravis (MG), is a neurological disease that causes weakness in the skeletal muscles, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The disease can also affect eyelid movements, facial expressions, talking, chewing and swallowing.

Myasthenia gravis occurs when the body’s own immune system attacks the neurotransmitter receptors on one’s muscles. This prevents the neurotransmitters responsible for muscle contraction from binding to nerve endings, thereby preventing muscle contraction. This results in the widespread muscle weakness that is the hallmark of this disease.

Duterte believes that he inherited the condition from his grandfather, who had myasthenia gravis as well. “One of my eyes is smaller. It roams on its own,” he said, according to a transcript released Sunday by his presidential office.

Although Duterte appears to be in relatively good health, and myasthenia gravis can be managed with treatment, about 20% of the people with the disease will experience a health crisis at some point in their lives.

To learn more about myasthenia gravis, visit the MG Foundation of America website.

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Top News in Autoimmune Disease – Sept. 22, 2019

Kim Kardashian West gets an ultrasound of her hand, leading to a ‘painful and scary’ diagnosis.

Kim Kardashian West Discusses ‘Painful and Scary’ Autoimmune Diagnosis

Celebrity and business mogul Kim Kardashian West discussed her recent autoimmune diagnosis on an episode of Keeping Up with the Kardashians. During the episode, Kardashian West visits a doctor with symptoms including pain, swelling and stiffness in her joints. She already has an autoimmune condition called psoriasis that causes red, flaky and scaly patches to appear on her skin, which she had developed at age 25 after catching a cold. Now, at age 38, she was informed that her psoriasis has morphed into psoriatic arthritis.

According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, 125 million people worldwide suffer from psoriasis. Furthermore, it’s estimated that 1 in 5 individuals with psoriasis will develop psoriatic arthritis in their lifetime.

Kardashian West said that her symptoms, including joint pain in her hands, got so bad that she was unable to even pick up a toothbrush. An initial blood test she took came back as positive for lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, but it was later shown to be a false positive after a review of her symptoms and getting an ultrasound of her hands.

Despite the harrowing diagnosis, Kardashian West is maintaining a positive attitude, saying “It’s still painful and scary, but I was happy to have a diagnosis. No matter what autoimmune condition I had, I was going to get through it, and they are all manageable with proper care.”

The star also bonded with fellow beauty mogul and fashion model Winnie Harlow, who has an autoimmune condition called vitiligo. As she revealed during a recent interview with Jimmy Fallon, Kardashian West spoke to Harlow for over an hour to get her ‘opinion and advice’ on her autoimmune diagnosis.

To learn more about psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis, visit the National Psoriasis Foundation website.

J.K. Rowling has made a multi-million dollar donation to fund MS research, at a clinic named after her late mother

J.K. Rowling Donates Millions to Fund Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Research

J.K. Rowling, renowned author of the Harry Potter book series, has made a generous donation to fund Multiple Sclerosis (MS) research in the U.K.

Her donation, in the amount of 15.3 Million British Pounds (equivalent to $18.8 Million USD), will be used to construct a new facility for the Anne Rowling Clinic at the University of Edinburgh, which is dedicated to MS research.

The Anne Rowling Clinic was established at the Scotland-based university in 2010, when J.K. Rowling had made another generous donation to fund MS research. The clinic was named after her mother, who suffered from MS and passed away due to complications from the disease at the young age of 45.

Rowling has said that she is immensely proud of the work that the clinic has accomplished, and that they are providing “practical, on the ground support and care for people with MS.” The University’s Vice Chancellor, Professor Peter Mathieson, also commented, “We are immensely honored that J. K. Rowling has chosen to continue her support for the Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic. This inspiring donation will fund a whole new generation of researchers who are focused on discovering and delivering better treatments and therapies for patients.”

To learn more about the Anne Rowling Clinic and to view a video of their important work, click here.

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Seeking treatment for chronic illness: when desperation takes over

Allyson Byers was desperate to find a treatment that worked for her painful chronic skin condition.

I recently read an article by Self magazine about a young woman named Allyson Byers who suffers from a chronic skin condition called Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS). According to the Hidradenitis Suppurativa Foundation, HS causes painful abscesses and boils to form in the folds of the skin, often around hair follicles, such as the underarms and groin. While the exact cause of HS in unknown, it is believed to be autoimmune in nature.

Although the condition isn’t actually rare, with about 1-4% of the general population affected, HS is often misdiagnosed as other conditions, like cystic acne. Patients also frequently don’t tell their physicians about their symptoms due to embarrassment, until they’ve reached stage 3 of the disease (at which point, surgery may be required).

Allyson was fortunate to have been diagnosed six months after the onset of the disease, as a result of a knowledgeable family physician who recognized the tell-tale symptoms. She then went on to see a dermatologist, who prescribed a variety of treatments, from antibiotics, to diabetes medication, hormone-suppressing drugs and even immunosuppressants. But nothing seemed to quell the prognosis of the disease, and eventually, Allyson found herself in so much pain, she couldn’t even raise her arms or even walk, due to the abscesses in her underarms and groin. It even affected her sleep.

Needless to say, she was desperate for a cure- or at least a treatment. Allyson said that in her desperation, she turned to alternative medicine to help. She tried everything from special diets, like the autoimmune protocol (AIP), to supplements and topical solutions (like turmeric, tea tree oil and special soaps). She even saw a chiropractor for a controversial diagnostic test called applied kinesiology, which involves exposing oneself to potential allergens and measuring changes in muscle strength. She spent thousands of dollars on unproven ‘treatments’ in her quest to reduce her painful symptoms.

I know all too well what it’s like to be Allyson—I have HS myself. Unlike her, however, it took six years for me to get a diagnosis (the doctors I had seen in Canada hadn’t even heard of the disease). Before I got diagnosed, I was so desperate for a cure that I purchased different creams, salves and ointments online, that had no medical proof, but that claimed to ‘cure’ my symptoms. One of the salves I bought caused a horrible burning sensation on my skin; another, an oil made out of emu fat (I’m not joking!), did absolutely nothing other than make my skin oily. Some of these so-called ‘treatments’ may have even made my condition worse.

Several members of my family, who are big proponents of alternative medicine, even brought me to a naturopath in the hopes of combating my Sjögren’s Syndrome symptons. I followed various different diets to no avail, took all types of unproven supplements, and even tried chelation therapy, which involves the intravenous administration of drugs to remove heavy metals from the body (this can even result in death). Although I am not against exploring alternative treatments and making lifestyle changes, none of these treatments improved my condition, and they cost even more than science-backed methods.

Like Allyson, I am tired of always trying to ‘chase’ a new treatment, scientific or not, in the hopes of finding a cure. Although I will never truly give up, I would urge others suffering from chronic illnesses not to get desperate; or at least to not allow your desperation to cloud your judgement. If you’re going to try an alternative therapy, at least run it by your physician first, so that you can ensure it’s safe before testing its effectiveness.

Have you had any success treating your condition with alternative medicine? Comment below!

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10 Facts About Sjögren’s Syndrome

According to the Sjögren’s Syndrome Foundation (SSF), Sjögren’s is a systemic autoimmune disease that impacts the entire body, including the eyes, mouth, joints, nerves and major organs. In honor of World Sjögren’s Day, read on to learn 10 facts about this chronic autoimmune condition.

1. It is more common than you think

The SSF estimates that there are as many as 4 million Americans living with the disease, and it’s the second most common autoimmune condition. The exact prevalence of the condition is difficult to determine, however, since the symptoms tend to mimic those of other conditions, such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome. It can even be confused with menopause, allergies, and drug side effects.

2. It mostly affects women

The SSF states that nine out of 10 Sjögren’s patients are women, and the average age of diagnosis is the late 40s. However, the disease can impact anyone of any age, including men and children as well.

3. It causes extensive dryness

Sjögren’s Syndrome develops as a result of the body’s immune system attacking and destroying the body’s exocrine, or moisture-producing, glands. As a consequence, patients experience widespread dryness throughout their body, but especially impacting their eyes, nose, mouth, skin, vagina and joints.

4. It affects the eyes

The disease is often first detected as a result of eye-related symptoms. This includes dry, gritty eyes that feel like sandpaper when blinking and swollen tear glands. Dry eyes can in turn lead to blurred vision, infections, corneal ulcerations and blepharitis. Several of the eye tests that can be used to help diagnose the condition include a Schirmer test, to measure tear production, and a Rose Bengal and Lissamine Green test, to examine dry spots on the eye’s surface.

5. It affects the mouth, throat and nose

Sjögren’s also affects one’s mouth, throat and nasal cavity; the main symptom being dryness. This, in turn, leads to a whole host of other symptoms, such as mouth sores, dental decay, oral thrush (a yeast infection of the mouth), recurrent sinusitis, nose bleeds, heartburn, reflux esophagitis, and difficulty speaking and swallowing. Some physicians administer a lip gland biopsy as a part of the diagnosis process.

6. It impacts one’s joints too

As the immune system destroys the body’s moisture-producing glands, this results in a decrease in synovial fluid, which helps to keep the joints lubricated. This causes inflammatory joint pain and musculoskeletal pain, and can even lead to the development of rheumatoid arthritis, as shown through a positive Rheumatoid Factor (RF) reading in the blood. In fact, the main physicians who treat Sjögren’s are rheumatologists.

7. Neurological problems are also common

Sjögren’s causes a variety of nervous system symptoms, including nerve pain and peripheral neuropathy (a numbness and tingling in the extremities). Other neurological problems include difficulty concentrating and memory loss, often referred to as “brain fog”.

8. The prognosis of the disease varies

Patients may find that their symptoms plateau, worsen, or, uncommonly, go into remission. A French research study published in Rheumatology also found that early onset primary Sjögren’s Syndrome carried a worse prognosis over the course of the disease (‘early onset’ is defined as a diagnosis before age 35). While some Sjögren’s patients experience mild discomfort, others suffer debilitating symptoms that greatly impair their quality of life.

9. It can increase one’s risk of cancer

A German study found that Sjögren’s Syndrome moderately increases one’s risk of developing Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL). NHL is a cancer of the lymphatic system, which includes the lymph nodes, spleen, and other tissues. The lifetime risk of developing NHL by age 80 is 8% among men and 5.4% among women with Sjögren’s. This is compared to a risk of 1.6% of men and 1.1% of women in the general population.

10. There is hope

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with Sjögren’s, check out the SSF’s video series, Conquering Sjögren’s, and their patient-published Self-Help Booklet. The foundation’s website, www.sjogrens.org, also contains a wealth of resources on the disease, including information about treatment options, survival tips, fact sheets, and even template letters for your health insurance company. You can also check out their extensive network of support groups.

Thank you for stopping by Autoimmune Warrior. If this article was informative to you, please like, share, and comment below!

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Top News in Autoimmune Disease – July 20, 2019

iMD Partners with the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA)

On July 17, 2019, iMD Health Global, a Toronto-based health technology company, announced that it has formed a strategic partnership with the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA). The partnership will help enhance communication between physicians and autoimmune disease patients to improve health outcomes.

iMD Health provides revolutionary technology to facilitate dialogue between physicians and patients inside the examination room. The iMD platform enables healthcare professionals to instantly access thousands of educational graphics, videos and resources at the point of care. The company’s platform is currently being used across Canada, and is now expanding across the United States as well.

Virginia Ladd, Executive Director & President of the AARDA commented, “With iMD, quick and easy access to a robust and visually appealing resource is now literally at the physician’s fingertips. With a better understanding of their conditions, patients can make informed and responsible decisions about managing their health and the required steps to address their condition.”

To read more about this exciting new partnership, click here.

Is There a Connection Between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and Autoimmune Disease?

Dawn Debois, a columnist on Lambert-Eaton News, explores the relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and the development of autoimmune disease.

Debois has several autoimmune conditions herself, including Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS), psoriatic arthritis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and ankylosing spondylitis. These conditions lead to her being diagnosed with multiple autoimmune syndrome.

Debois believes that the early childhood trauma that she experienced from losing her mother before the age of five and being placed into foster care may have triggered the onset of these autoimmune conditions. She completed a questionnaire that revealed that she had an ACE score of four, which is considered high, and is a high predictor of diagnosed autoimmune disease in adulthood, according to this study.

She further discusses the prevalence of the protein HLA-B27 in her blood, which can lead to a higher risk of developing certain autoimmune diseases. Therefore, while early childhood trauma may be an environmental factor affecting the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, there are genetic factors as well.

To read more about Deb’s story and the link between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and autoimmunity, click here.

Actress Jameela Jamil Describes Life with Autoimmune Disease

British actress and model Jameela Jamil struggles with daily living with two chronic illnesses, including an autoimmune disease.

British actress and model Jameela Jamil took to Instagram this week to describe her struggle of living with an autoimmune disease. The 33-year-old suffers from Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, an autoimmune disease in which one’s immune system attacks the thyroid gland, causing hypothryoidism (an underactive thyroid). This, in turn, can lead to symptoms such as weight gain, fatigue and depression.

Jamil wrote, “Living with an autoimmune condition is a real pain in the arse, and it irrationally makes you feel like a failure for not being able to “live it up” like other “normal” people. Shout out to all of us who struggle with this, and go through all of the incredible shitty days, and make it through each one. Even if it’s just by the skin of our teeth. We are LEGENDS for our strength of character.”

In addition to Hashimoto’s, Jamil also revealed that she has Ehler’s-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type 3. While this chronic illness is not autoimmune, in causes various painful symptoms, such as joint hypermobility, loose joints, poor wound healing and easy bruising. Like Hashimoto’s, there is no cure for EDS. Jamil confirmed her condition after a fan asked her why her arm was overextended in a photo on Twitter, then subsequently posted a video stretching her skin.

Jamil also described how hard it is to take care of herself, while others around her experience few health problems, even if they don’t care for their health. She wrote on her Instagram page, “Shout out if you are so fucking tired of having to protect yourself in a bubble while so many other people are able to just eat what they want, take drugs, stay out all night, drink a lot, take risks, do sports….etc. But you make one less than perfect choice and your day/week is ruined. The envy is real…I see you. I hear you. I feel you. I’m with you.”

To read more about Jameela Jamil and her fight against Hashimoto’s and EDS, click here.

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How a 71-year-old man got diagnosed with Autoimmune Encephalitis (AE)

Robert Given was a 71-year-old Accountant who ran his own CPA firm and was heavily involved in his local community. Although he didn’t have any prior history of autoimmune disease, he suddenly found himself impacted by a severe autoimmune condition.

While dining out with friends, Given suddenly slumped over, had a seizure, and urinated on himself. Restaurant patrons helped him to lay on the floor and called an ambulance. By the time the ambulance arrived, he had regained consciousness but was confused, refusing to step into the ambulance until his wife told him to.

After being evaluated by a number of physicians, including an internist and a neurologist, the medical professionals made several interesting discoveries. Given had had a sudden drop in blood pressure that was uncharacteristic for someone with well-controlled high blood pressure like himself. His wife also reported that he was losing his balance, had difficulty sleeping and sometimes had slurred speech. He was also highly talkative, to the point that it appeared to be logorrhea – a constant need to talk, even if the speech is often incoherent and repetitive.

Given had a second seizure, and was once again transported to the hospital. After this second episode, his doctor pondered what condition could possibly cause a sudden onset of both neurological and psychiatric symptoms. He hypothesized that his patient might have either Multiple Sclerosis (MS), or some type of heavy metal toxicity and ordered a round of tests to see if this was the case.

The tests came back negative for MS and heavy metals, and his medical team thought that they had to go back to the drawing board. Suddenly, however, his internist Dr. Hersch realized that he had seen a similar case several years prior; the patient had died, but his test results had revealed that he had autoimmune encephalitis (AE), a group of conditions in which the immune system mistakenly attacks the brain.

Dr. Hersch ordered a new round a tests that confirmed that Robert Given did indeed have a type of autoimmune encephalitis caused by a rogue antibody called CASPR2. Symptoms included fluctuations in blood pressure and heart rate, loss of balance, insomnia, and personality changes, and the majority of patients were men over the age of 65- just like Given!

Given has been receiving treatment for his condition at the Mayo Clinic for the last three years. Due to the difficult nature of this disease, his recovery is slow, but he is relieved to have been diagnosed in time to receive life-saving medication.

The Autoimmune Encephalitis Alliance says that while Given is lucky to have received a diagnosis, their aim is to raise awareness so that others with AE do not have to rely on luck to determine the outcome of the disease.

To read the original story by Dr. Lisa Sanders from the New York Times, click here. Also, check out this trailer for Brain on Fire, a movie based on a real-life story of a woman with AE.