How Chronic Illness Can Kill Your Self-Esteem

Chronic Illness and Self-Esteem

I recently read a post on Reddit on the r/autoimmunity subreddit titled ‘Losing Everything‘. In the post, the author describes being diagnosed with Sjogren’s Syndrome, an autoimmune condition affecting one’s moisture-producing glands. The author has also been living with other autoimmune diseases, including Graves’ disease, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis and Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis (GPA), for quite some time.

She goes on to say that since being diagnosed with these conditions, she feels like she is losing everything that makes her ‘herself’. For example, she is an artist, but she has lost the use of her dominant hand as a result of her conditions, leading her to quit her art. She also had a unique style, with beautiful thick hair and piercings. However, most of her hair has now fallen out and she had to remove her piercings due to constant infections.

The author’s post made me think of my own struggle with chronic illness and how having Sjogren’s Syndrome, Hidradenitis Suppurativa (HS) and Benign Fasciculation Syndrome (BFS) has impacted my sense of self.

Although I have both good days and bad days, I often resent my body and these diseases for what they have ‘taken away’ from my life. I often think to myself, what would I have accomplished by now had it not been for this disease? Would I be further along in my career? My education? Would I have more social connections and deeper friendships? It’s hard to quantify, but I feel like my life would have been very different had I not developed autoimmune issues. In other words, I don’t feel like I can be my true ambitious self because of my chronic illnesses.

I could also relate to the author’s mention of her outward appearance, like her hair and piercings. I notice that I often think ‘why bother?’ when it comes to things like fashion and beauty, which were important to me before my diagnosis. I think this is because I’ve adopted the mindset that I am ‘diseased’, so why bother to look nice? This is definitely a negative mindset that I’m continuing to work on, but, I think it’s important to acknowledge how chronic illness can impact your sense of self- whether it’s your own self-image, or even your outward appearance.

I also recently read a powerful testimony on The Mighty by Megan Klenke titled, ‘How Chronic Illness Can Drastically Affect Your Self-Esteem’. In her post, she describes the shame that many individuals with chronic conditions and disabilities face, such as having to ask for help to do tasks that they once did independently, using a wheelchair, or dealing with embarrassing side effects of medications. Furthermore, Megan also points out that simple things like missing family functions or get-togethers with friends as a result of illness can make one feel left out and like an ‘awful’ family member or friend.

A YouTuber I follow named Samantha Wayne also created a video detailing her struggle with the impact of lupus on her self-image. She ended up being hospitalized and had to take time off to rest. During this time, she says she felt useless and like she wasn’t doing enough. Also, she had to step back from her job because being on her feet all day was taking a toll on her health. The medications she was taking, such as prednisone, also impacted her outward appearance.

Samantha did say that leaning on her support system has helped her to get through negative feelings about her self-worth. She also says that realizing that everyone is worthy, regardless of their health status, has also helped. Furthermore, she says that while her disease caused her to lose certain hobbies, like competitive basketball, she was able to adopt new hobbies and learn new skills such as video blogging on her YouTube channel, which she started in order to raise awareness about lupus. Finally, she says that practicing gratitude for the things she can do and what she has is another way that has helped to overcome her low self-esteem.

Has having a chronic illness impacted your self-confidence, and if so, how have you handled it? Let us know in the comments below!

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Pop Singer Sia Reveals Battle with Autoimmune & Other Chronic Conditions; Philippines Leader Rodrigo Duterte Says He Has Autoimmune Disease

Pop Singer Sia Reveals Battle with Autoimmune & Other Chronic Conditions

Pop singer Sia recently revealed in a Tweet that she is battling chronic pain as a result of an autoimmune disease and another genetic condition.

In the Tweet, Sia said, “Hey, I’m suffering with chronic pain, a neurological disease, [and] ehlers danlos and I just wanted to say to those of you suffering from pain, whether physical or emotional, I love you, keep going,” she wrote. “Life is fucking hard. Pain is demoralizing, and you’re not alone.”

Sia suffers from an autoimmune condition called Grave’s disease, which occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the thryoid gland. This results in hyperthyroidism, which is the overproduction of the thyroid hormone. Without treatment, the disease can result in heart problems like irregular heartbeat, blot clots, stroke, and heart failure, as well as eye health issues, like double vision, light sensitivity, eye pain and vision loss. It can even lead to thinning bones and osteoporosis.

In addition to Grave’s, Sia has Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a genetic condition and connective tissue disorder that can affect one’s bones, joints, skin and blood vessels.

Sia’s Tweet has garnered over 170,000 ‘likes’ on Twitter and has many fans responding with well-wishes and sharing their own experiences with chronic illness. One fan tweeted, “We love you so much Sia, you’re not alone either, please take care ❤ sending you lots of love and healing vibes.”

Her Tweet also draws similarities to Jameela Jamil’s Instagram message, in which she also revealed that she has Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and another autoimmune disease called Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, which causes hypothyroidism (the opposite of Grave’s Disease).

To learn more about Grave’s Disease, visit the American Thyroid Association.

Philippines Leader Rodrigo Duterte Says He Has Autoimmune Disease

The President of the Philippines, 74-year-old Rodrigo Duterte, says he suffers from an incurable autoimmune disease. The condition, called myasthenia gravis (MG), is a neurological disease that causes weakness in the skeletal muscles, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. The disease can also affect eyelid movements, facial expressions, talking, chewing and swallowing.

Myasthenia gravis occurs when the body’s own immune system attacks the neurotransmitter receptors on one’s muscles. This prevents the neurotransmitters responsible for muscle contraction from binding to nerve endings, thereby preventing muscle contraction. This results in the widespread muscle weakness that is the hallmark of this disease.

Duterte believes that he inherited the condition from his grandfather, who had myasthenia gravis as well. “One of my eyes is smaller. It roams on its own,” he said, according to a transcript released Sunday by his presidential office.

Although Duterte appears to be in relatively good health, and myasthenia gravis can be managed with treatment, about 20% of the people with the disease will experience a health crisis at some point in their lives.

To learn more about myasthenia gravis, visit the MG Foundation of America website.

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iMD Partners with the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA); Is There a Connection Between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and Autoimmune Disease?

iMD Partners with the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA)

On July 17, 2019, iMD Health Global, a Toronto-based health technology company, announced that it has formed a strategic partnership with the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA). The partnership will help enhance communication between physicians and autoimmune disease patients to improve health outcomes.

iMD Health provides revolutionary technology to facilitate dialogue between physicians and patients inside the examination room. The iMD platform enables healthcare professionals to instantly access thousands of educational graphics, videos and resources at the point of care. The company’s platform is currently being used across Canada, and is now expanding across the United States as well.

Virginia Ladd, Executive Director & President of the AARDA commented, “With iMD, quick and easy access to a robust and visually appealing resource is now literally at the physician’s fingertips. With a better understanding of their conditions, patients can make informed and responsible decisions about managing their health and the required steps to address their condition.”

To read more about this exciting new partnership, click here.

Is There a Connection Between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and Autoimmune Disease?

Dawn Debois, a columnist on Lambert-Eaton News, explores the relationship between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and the development of autoimmune disease.

Debois has several autoimmune conditions herself, including Lambert-Eaton Myasthenic Syndrome (LEMS), psoriatic arthritis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and ankylosing spondylitis. These conditions lead to her being diagnosed with multiple autoimmune syndrome.

Debois believes that the early childhood trauma that she experienced from losing her mother before the age of five and being placed into foster care may have triggered the onset of these autoimmune conditions. She completed a questionnaire that revealed that she had an ACE score of four, which is considered high, and is a high predictor of diagnosed autoimmune disease in adulthood, according to this study.

She further discusses the prevalence of the protein HLA-B27 in her blood, which can lead to a higher risk of developing certain autoimmune diseases. Therefore, while early childhood trauma may be an environmental factor affecting the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, there are genetic factors as well.

To read more about Deb’s story and the link between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) and autoimmunity, click here.