Top News in Autoimmunity – Week of Feb. 20, 2019

Lupus Strongly Linked to Imbalances in Gut Microbiome

Scientists at the NYU School of Medicine have discovered that systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is strongly linked to imbalances in the body’s gut microbiome.

The study showed that 61 women diagnosed with lupus had five times more Ruminococcus gnavus gut bacteria compared to 17 women who were healthy and did not have lupus. The study also showed that the abnormal levels of gut bacteria appeared to positively correlate with lupus ‘flares’, which are instances when lupus symptoms, such as joint pain, skin rashes, and kidney dysfuntion, increase dramatically.

Dr. Gregg Silverman, immunologist and one of the lead researchers in the study, commented, “Our study strongly suggests that in some patients bacterial imbalances may be driving lupus and its associated disease flares.”

Dr. Silverman also stated that the study may give way to new treatments for the disease, such as probiotics, fecal transplants, or dietary regimens that prevent the growth of the Ruminococcus gnavus gut bacteria. The study also discusses the role of ‘leaky gut’ in triggering the body’s autoimmune reaction.

To read more about the study, click here.

Immunology ‘Boot Camp’ Emphasizes the Role of Chronic Stress in Autoimmune Disease

Leonard Calabrese, Vice Chairman of rheumatic and immunologic disease at the Cleveland Clinic, emphasized the role of chronic stress in the development of autoimmune diseases during an immunology ‘boot camp’.

During his speech, Calabrese cited data that chronic stress compromised the body’s surveillance of pathogens. As a result, modern stressors, such as PTSD, major depression, and the stress associated with being a caregiver, which are chronic in nature, may trigger the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. This is in contrast to acute stress, which comes in response to immediate dangers, ‘like our ancestors encountering a saber-toothed tiger’, states Calabrese.

The link between chronic stress and autoimmunity has given way to the development a several new therapies. For example, parasympathetic and vagal nerve stimulation are now in development to treat pain-related and autoimmune conditions, such as Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) and fibromyalgia.

To read more about this research, click here.

Interested in reading more? See last week’s top news in autoimmunity here.

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